previous - go to surnames

Collyer, Thomas (~1680 - ) - male
b. ABT. 1680

father: Collyer, John (~1665 - 1714)
mother: Snelling, Mary (~1649 - )
Colyar, Alexander (~1790 - 1856) - male
b. ABT. 1790 in Tennessee
d. 1856 in Franklin Co., Tennessee

father: Colyar, William (1754 - 1819)
mother: St. Clair, Agnus "Nancy" Ann (~1760 - ~1839)
From website of Jean Colyer Grumbling: this Power of Attorney of sonAlexander Colyar (son of William) which states that William Colyar andwife Nancy may have been living in Pulaski County Kentucky at the date oftheir death :


Power of Attorney dated February 26, 1839 reads as follows:


Know all men by thesse present that I, alexander Colyear of the County ofFranklin and State of Tennessee hereby nominate, constitue and appoint myson, George T. Colyer of said county and state, my true and lawfullAttorney in fact for me and in my name to do and attend to all business Ihave any interest in in the state of Kentucky and more particularly toask for, receive from and receipt for all money coming to me from theestate of my deceased Father, William Colyear late of the County ofPulaski and state of Kentucky or from the estate of my deceased mother,Nancy Colyear of said county and state and my said Attorney is alsohereby authorized to bring suit or suits as he may think proper for therecovery of the same or to compromise the same in such way as he maythink best and to give such receipts in my name as may be necessaryhereby satisfying and confirming all the acts of my said Attorney may doin pursuance of this poser the same as if I was present and done the samemyself. Given under my hand and seal this 26th day of February 1839.
Alexander Colyear (his mark) ?
State of Tennessee
Franklin County
I, John R. Paterick(?)an acting Justice of the Peace in and for thecounty and state aforsaid hereby certify that Alexander Colyearpersonally appeared before me this day and acknowledged the within powerof Attorney to be his act and deed for the purpose therein expressed.
Given under my hand and seal this 26th day of February, 1839.
John R. Patrick
Justice of the Peace
State of Tennessee
Franklin County
I, William W. Brazelton, clerk of the County Court of said County certifythat John R. Patrick is and was at the time of making the above(unreadable) an acting Justice of the Peace in and for said County dulycommissioned, legally qualified as such and entitled to (unreadable) andcredit in all of his official acts.
In Witness whereof I have here unto set my hand and affixed my seal ofoffice at office, the 26th day of February, A.D.1839
William W. Brazelton, Clerk
State of Tennessee
Franklin County
I, Wallis Estill (?) Jr., chariman and presiding magistrate of the countycourt of said county certify that William W. Brazelton whose name issigned to the foregoing certificate is and was Clerk of said county ofthe time of signing the same and that his attestation is in due form ofLaw and sealed with the county seal. Given under my hand and seal this26th day of February A.D. 1839.
W. Estill Jr. Chairman of Franklin County Court
(followed by another certification by Will Fawcett!


Copy of Power of Attorney, now on file with Jean Colyer Grumbling.POAlocated in Book 10, Page 147.
"Tennessee" by Moore, pg. 102

spouse: Sherrill, Katherine (Kate) Sevier (1795 - )
----------child: Colyer, George Thompson (~1816 - 1848)
----------child: Colyar, Arthur St. Clair (1818 - 1907)
----------child: Colyar, Elbert F. (~1820 - 1897)
----------child: Colyar, Katherine (1824 - )
----------child: Colyar, Nancy (1826 - )
----------child: Colyar, Mary (1828 - )
----------child: Colyar, Charity (1830 - )
----------child: Colyar, Elbert Franklin Sevier (1830 - 1897)
----------child: Colyar, Emeline (1832 - )
----------child: Colyar, Caroline (1834 - )
----------child: Colyar, Susan (1835 - )
----------child: Colyar, Susan (1835 - )
----------child: Colyar, Sarah (1836 - 1908)
----------child: Colyar, Martha Clarissa (1838 - 1893)
----------child: Colyar, Sarah (1840 - 1908)
Colyar, Arthur St. Clair (1818 - 1907) - male
b. 23 JUN 1818 in Washington county , TN
d. 13 DEC 1907 in Nashville, TN

father: Colyar, Alexander (~1790 - 1856)
mother: Sherrill, Katherine (Kate) Sevier (1795 - )
[ColyerV2.FTW]


Subject moved with parents to Franklin County, c.1828; after leavingfather's farm


From the Procedings of the Bar Association of Tennessee.


REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON OBITUARIES
AND MEMORIALS,'
I-Ion. Foster V. Brown, President: The Special Committee
appointed to draft memorials of the members who have died
since the former meet.ing, to be inserted in the published pro-ccedings
of the Tennessee Bar Association, beg leave to submit
the following :
ARTHUR ST, CLAIR COLYAR. '
Col. Arthur St. Clair Colyar was born in a dwelling sit-uated
on the banks of the historic Nolachucky River, in Wash- _
ington County, seven miles west of Jonesboro, June 23, 1815,
and died at Nashville, December 13, 1907. His long life, thcre-fore,
extended over a period of more than 89 years. During
this lapse of time, beginning almost with the infancy of the
country, what a kaleidescope of change passed before his discerning
eyes !
When he was about nine years old his father, Alexander
Colyar, `removed to Hillsboro in what is now Franklin County, -and,
as the father was a farmer, Arthur began industrial life
as a plow boy, and received onlysuch education as could be
had in a pioneer country. -At the age of `22 he entered the office
of Col. Micah Tane, of VJinchester, as a law student. In 1846
he obtained his license and formed a partnership with W. P.
Hickerson, at Winchester. Here he soon made a reputation
which encouraged him to venture into wider fields ; he removed
in a few years to Winchester, and formed a partnership with
his kinsman, A. S. Marks, who was afterwards Governor, and
with John Frizzell, who afterward became a prominent man.
Col. Colyar's public spirit led -him into active politics, State
and National. He was a member of the' national convention
in 1860, which nominated Bell and Everett for President and
Vice-President respectively, on `the Whig ticket, and made an
active canvass in favor of the ticket in the hope of saving the
Union. He opposed secession, but at the parting of the ways .


he cast his destiny with the South. He was elected to the ConfederateCongress, in which he served with `the same zealand energy that alwayscharacterized the man. After the Civil \Var he settled at Nashville andpracticed law, at one time in partnership with Henry S. Foote, and atother times
alone, or in association with various other attorneys. *
A fen- years after the close of the war he came connected
as stockholder, director and president, of the Tennessee Coal
and Railroad Railroad Company.
afterward the Tennessee Coal, Iron &
Railroad Company. He was not especially gifted as a
business man, but by his efforts he saved the company from wreck, andso inspired the financial world with his confidence
in the industry that it was placed on .he way to a success that hasfinally brought it to a very high place among the industries of thecountry. About this time he was very aggressive
in his fight against a ring rule in the city of Nashville, which
resulted in the city being placed in the hands of a receiver and
in its complete relief from its distressing condition.


In 1881 he took charge-of the American, a leading paper throughdut theState.
His last important work was of a historic and `literary
character, and in this, as a fitting climax to his laborious and
zealous life, he left behind him the fruit of years of painstaking labor.
Nothing that he ever did was perhaps more pleasing and gratifying to himthan his authorship of the "Life and Times of Andrew Jackson", which istruly a monument to his industry in his old age.


Col. Colyar was always prominent as a lawver especially
as an advocate, being eloquent, strong in debate, and forceful
in pursuit of what was right. He was a participant in many of
the most important suits in both State and Federal Courts.
Among other important cases, he represented the State in the
United States Supreme Court in the boundnrv line case between
Virginia and Tennessee, which he won in 1893.


One of Col. Colyar's most pronounced characteristics was his strong
and enthusiastic interest in everything pertaining
to public well-being and moral welfare. He was in deep sympathy witheverything tending to the material prosperity of the country, and theintellectual, moral and religions culture
of society, and was found among the active promoters of schools, collegesand churches, and was an ardent advocate of the establishment andconstruction of railroads,manufactories, mines and commercial andfinancial enterprises. He was an uncompromising' friend of law andorder, sobriety and
purity -in individuals and government. He was a total abstainer
and was the author of the Four Mile Law, one of the:
most unique and successful bits of legislation that the country
has known. His courage was almost unlimited. Like all posi-tive
characters he occasionally fell into mistakes of judgment,
and was sometimes criticised even when he was in the right.
As might be expected of such an one, he sacrificed himself, so
far as public office was concerned, and died a poor man, being
in active practice almost to the end of his days. The objects
and purposes of the Bar Association fell naturally in line with
Col. - Colyar's instincts and principles, for whatever organization
tended or purposed to cultivate right dealing, right thinking
and professional ethics could not fail to meet with his
warm and enthusiastic sympathy and support To the end of
his life these things were his guilding stars.


[Collierj.ftw]


Arthur St. Clair Colyar came from a poor family which eventually moved toFranklin co., Tennessee. He was self-educated and studied law. Hemaintained a law office in Nashville but did not live in that city until1866. (His son, John B. Colyar, wrote A Boy's Opinion of General Lee). AWhig, he became a Constitutional Unionist and opposed immediatesecession. In 1863, he risked his life by defending Tennessee Unionistswho had been unlawfully arrested. He was elected to the second House inMay, 1864. He served on the Ways and Means Committee, generallysupported the administration, and favored extending the tax-in-kind. Hewas a staunch opponent of any special priveliges for Southerncorporations. Along with John B. Baldwin of Virginia, he tried topressure Congress into negotiations with the North even before theHampton Roads meeting. After the war, Colyar became an importantDemocratic party leader but lost the race for governor in 1878. Colyarwas an active lawyer who wrote for the Confederate Veteran. He alsoreorganized the Tennessee Coal and Railroad Company and became itspresident. He was considered a conservative because of his 1867 appealto allow the freedman the vote. From 1881 to 1884, he edited theNashville American. He also wrote the Life and Times of Andrew Jackson.He died in Nashville December 13, 1907.


from Biographical Dictionary of the Confederacy
Jon L. Wakelyn
Westport, CT 1977
Arthur St. Clair Colyar came from a poor family which eventually moved toFranklin, Tennessee. He was self-educated and studied law. He maintaineda law office in Nashville but did not live in that city until 1866. (Hisson, John B. Colyar, wrote A Boy's Opinion of General Lee). A Whig, hebecame a Constitutional Unionist and opposed immediate secession. In1863, he risked his life by defending Tennessee Unionists who had beenunlawfully arrested. He was elected to the second House in May, 1864. Heserved on the Ways and Means Committee, generally supported theadministration, and favored extending the tax-in-kind. He was a staunchopponent of any special priveliges for Southern corporations. Along withJohn B. Baldwin of Virginia, he tried to pressure Congress intonegotiations with the North even before the Hampton Roads meeting. Afterthe war, Colyar became an important Democratic party leader but lost therace for governor in 1878. Colyar was an active lawyer who wrote for theConfederate Veteran. He also reorganized the Tennessee Coal and RailroadCompany and became its president. He was considered a conservativebecause of his 1867 appeal to allow the freedman the vote. From 1881 to1884, he edited the Nashville American. He also wrote the Life and Timesof Andrew Jackson. He died in Nashville December 13, 1907.


from Biographical Dictionary of the Confederacy by Jon L. Wakelyn,Westport, CT 1977
He moved with parents to Franklin County, c.1828; after leaving father'sfarm


From the Procedings of the Bar Association of Tennessee.


REPORT OF SPECIAL COMMITTEE ON OBITUARIES AND MEMORIALS,'
Hon. Foster V. Brown, President: The Special Committee appointed to draftmemorials of the members who have died since the former meet.ing, to beinserted in the published proceedings of the Tennessee Bar Association,beg leave to submit the following :
ARTHUR ST, CLAIR COLYAR.
Col. Arthur St. Clair Colyar was born in a dwelling situated on the banksof the historic Nolachucky River, in Washington County, seven miles westof Jonesboro, June 23, 1815,
and died at Nashville, December 13, 1907. His long life, therefore,extended over a period of more than 89 years. During this lapse of time,beginning almost with the infancy of the country, what a kaleidescope ofchange passed before his discerning eyes !
When he was about nine years old his father, Alexander
Colyar, `removed to Hillsboro in what is now Franklin County, -and,
as the father was a farmer, Arthur began industrial life
as a plow boy, and received onlysuch education as could be
had in a pioneer country. -At the age of `22 he entered the office
of Col. Micah Tane, of Winchester, as a law student. In 1846
he obtained his license and formed a partnership with W. P.
Hickerson, at Winchester. Here he soon made a reputation
which encouraged him to venture into wider fields ; he removed
in a few years to Winchester, and formed a partnership with
his kinsman, A. S. Marks, who was afterwards Governor, and
with John Frizzell, who afterward became a prominent man.
Col. Colyar's public spirit led -him into active politics, State
and National. He was a member of the' national convention
in 1860, which nominated Bell and Everett for President and
Vice-President respectively, on `the Whig ticket, and made an
active canvass in favor of the ticket in the hope of saving the
Union. He opposed secession, but at the parting of the ways .


he cast his destiny with the South. He was elected to the ConfederateCongress, in which he served with `the same zealand energy that alwayscharacterized the man. After the Civil \Var he settled at Nashville andpracticed law, at one time in partnership with Henry S. Foote, and atother times
alone, or in association with various other attorneys. *
A fen- years after the close of the war he came connected
as stockholder, director and president, of the Tennessee Coal
and Railroad Railroad Company.
afterward the Tennessee Coal, Iron &
Railroad Company. He was not especially gifted as a
business man, but by his efforts he saved the company from wreck, andso inspired the financial world with his confidence
in the industry that it was placed on .he way to a success that hasfinally brought it to a very high place among the industries of thecountry. About this time he was very aggressive
in his fight against a ring rule in the city of Nashville, which
resulted in the city being placed in the hands of a receiver and
in its complete relief from its distressing condition.


In 1881 he took charge-of the American, a leading paper throughdut theState.
His last important work was of a historic and `literary
character, and in this, as a fitting climax to his laborious and
zealous life, he left behind him the fruit of years of painstaking labor.
Nothing that he ever did was perhaps more pleasing and gratifying to himthan his authorship of the "Life and Times of Andrew Jackson", which istruly a monument to his industry in his old age.


Col. Colyar was always prominent as a lawver especially
as an advocate, being eloquent, strong in debate, and forceful
in pursuit of what was right. He was a participant in many of
the most important suits in both State and Federal Courts.
Among other important cases, he represented the State in the
United States Supreme Court in the boundnrv line case between
Virginia and Tennessee, which he won in 1893.


One of Col. Colyar's most pronounced characteristics was his strong
and enthusiastic interest in everything pertaining
to public well-being and moral welfare. He was in deep sympathy witheverything tending to the material prosperity of the country, and theintellectual, moral and religions culture
of society, and was found among the active promoters of schools, collegesand churches, and was an ardent advocate of the establishment andconstruction of railroads,manufactories, mines and commercial andfinancial enterprises. He was an uncompromising' friend of law andorder, sobriety and
purity -in individuals and government. He was a total abstainer
and was the author of the Four Mile Law, one of the:
most unique and successful bits of legislation that the country
has known. His courage was almost unlimited. Like all posi-tive
characters he occasionally fell into mistakes of judgment,
and was sometimes criticised even when he was in the right.
As might be expected of such an one, he sacrificed himself, so
far as public office was concerned, and died a poor man, being
in active practice almost to the end of his days. The objects
and purposes of the Bar Association fell naturally in line with
Col. - Colyar's instincts and principles, for whatever organization
tended or purposed to cultivate right dealing, right thinking
and professional ethics could not fail to meet with his
warm and enthusiastic sympathy and support To the end of
his life these things were his guilding stars.
[Colyer.FTW]


Subject moved with parents to Franklin County, c.1828; after leavingfather's farm

spouse: Kavanaugh, Mary Elizabeth Collier (*1822 - )
spouse:
----------child: Colyer, Isabel (*1853 - )
----------child: Colyer, Arthur St. Clair Jr. (*1861 - )
spouse: Estill, Agnes Erskine (1826 - 1885)
- m. 9 DEC 1847 in Franklin Co., Tennessee

----------child: Colyar, Wallace E. (1849 - )
----------child: Colyar, George (1851 - )
----------child: Colyar, John B. (1853 - )
----------child: Colyar, Lila (~1855 - )
----------child: Colyar, Henry (~1855 - )
----------child: Colyar, Berta (~1855 - )
----------child: Colyar, Liley (*1855 - )
----------child: Colyar, Henry (*1855 - )
----------child: Colyer, Bertha (*1855 - )
----------child: Colyer, Wallace E. (*1855 - )
----------child: Colyer, LiLa (*1855 - )
----------child: Colyar, Lula (1857 - )
spouse: Mcguire, Mary (*1853 - )
- m. 1888

Colyar, Berta (~1855 - ) - female
b. ABT. 1855

father: Colyar, Arthur St. Clair (1818 - 1907)
mother: Estill, Agnes Erskine (1826 - 1885)
spouse: Norris, Edward (*1851 - )
spouse: Scott, Barney (*1851 - )
Colyar, Caroline (1834 - ) - female
b. 1834

father: Colyar, Alexander (~1790 - 1856)
mother: Sherrill, Katherine (Kate) Sevier (1795 - )
Colyar, Charity (1830 - ) - female
b. 1830

father: Colyar, Alexander (~1790 - 1856)
mother: Sherrill, Katherine (Kate) Sevier (1795 - )
This husband and wife are cousins, Marcus Lashbrook's mother was UrsulaColyar sister to Alexander Colyar.
spouse: Lashbrook, Marcus Lindsay (*1820 - )
- m. 27 AUG 1853 in Franklin Co., Tennessee

Colyar, Edward (~1750 - ) - male
b. ABT. 1750

father: Collier, William (1724 - 1815)
Colyar, Elbert F. (~1820 - 1897) - male
b. ABT. 1820
d. 1897 in Tracy City Tennessee

father: Colyar, Alexander (~1790 - 1856)
mother: Sherrill, Katherine (Kate) Sevier (1795 - )
spouse: Unknown, Catherine (*1824 - )
Colyar, Elbert Franklin Sevier (1830 - 1897) - male
b. 1830 in Jonesboro TN
d. 1897 in Tracy City, Grundy county TN

father: Colyar, Alexander (~1790 - 1856)
mother: Sherrill, Katherine (Kate) Sevier (1795 - )
spouse: Smiley, Harriet (*1834 - )
Colyar, Elizabeth (~1750 - ) - female
b. ABT. 1750

father: Collier, William (1724 - 1815)
Colyar, Emeline (1832 - ) - female
b. 1832

father: Colyar, Alexander (~1790 - 1856)
mother: Sherrill, Katherine (Kate) Sevier (1795 - )
Colyar, George (1851 - ) - male
b. 1851

father: Colyar, Arthur St. Clair (1818 - 1907)
mother: Estill, Agnes Erskine (1826 - 1885)
Colyar, Henry (~1750 - ) - male
b. ABT. 1750

father: Collier, William (1724 - 1815)
Colyar, Henry (~1855 - ) - male
b. ABT. 1855

father: Colyar, Arthur St. Clair (1818 - 1907)
mother: Estill, Agnes Erskine (1826 - 1885)
Colyar, Henry (*1855 - ) - male
father: Colyar, Arthur St. Clair (1818 - 1907)
mother: Estill, Agnes Erskine (1826 - 1885)
Colyar, John B. (1853 - ) - male
b. 1853

father: Colyar, Arthur St. Clair (1818 - 1907)
mother: Estill, Agnes Erskine (1826 - 1885)
[Colyer.FTW]


[Collierj.ftw]


Wrote A Boy's Opinion of General Lee.
[ColyerV2.FTW]


[Collierj.ftw]


Wrote A Boy's Opinion of General Lee.


How the president of Washington College appeared to a shy young freshmanfrom
Tennessee is told by John B. Colyar.
Appears on page 477 of The Robert E. Lee Reader by Stanley F. Horn
Impressions as a student at Washington College Lexington
" The morning after we reached Lexington we repaired to the office ofGeneral Lee for the purpose of matriculation and receiving instructionsas to the duties devolving upon us as students. I entered the officewith reerential awe, expecting to see the great warrior whose fame thenencircled the civilized globe as I had pictured him in my ownimagination. General Lee was alone, looking over a paper. He arose whenwe entered and received with a quiet, gentlemenly dignity that was sonatural and easy and kind that the feeling of awe left me at thethreshold of his door. General Lee had but one manner in hisintercourse with men. It was the same as to the peasant as to theprince, and the student was received with the easy courtliness that wouldhave bestowed on the greatest imperial dignitary of Europe.


When we had registered, my brother asked the General for a copy ofhis rules. General Lee said, "young gentleman, we have no printedrules. We have but one rule here and it is that every student must be agentleman." I did not until after years fully realize thecomprehensiveness of his remark and how completely it covered everyessential rule that should govern the conduct and intercourse of men."...........


Colyar, Katherine (1824 - ) - female
b. 1824

father: Colyar, Alexander (~1790 - 1856)
mother: Sherrill, Katherine (Kate) Sevier (1795 - )
spouse: Hyder, Adam L. (*1822 - )
- m. 6 JAN 1848

Colyar, Lila (~1855 - ) - female
b. ABT. 1855

father: Colyar, Arthur St. Clair (1818 - 1907)
mother: Estill, Agnes Erskine (1826 - 1885)
spouse: Thompson, Harry G. (*1851 - )
Colyar, Liley (*1855 - ) - female
father: Colyar, Arthur St. Clair (1818 - 1907)
mother: Estill, Agnes Erskine (1826 - 1885)
spouse: Thompson, Harry G. (*1851 - )
Colyar, Lula (1857 - ) - female
b. 1857

father: Colyar, Arthur St. Clair (1818 - 1907)
mother: Estill, Agnes Erskine (1826 - 1885)
http://www2.volstate.edu/cbucy/History%202030/suffrage.htm
Lulu Colyar Reese, Memphis (1860-19 )


Lulu Colyar Reese had her first introduction into thepolitical world at the age of seventeen, when she joined other Nashvillewomen in an appearance before the Tennessee General Assembly to securethe property of Andrew Jackson, the Hermitage, for the state. The effortwas successful and the Ladies Hermitage Association was founded.


After her marriage to Isaac B. Reese, she had regularmeetings and gatherings in their home to bring together society leaders,Vanderbilt professors, and other thinkers of the city for conversationand interaction. As many as 300 persons attended these gatherings whichwere described as a "Parisian salon." When the Reese family moved toPaducah, Kentucky, she founded a similar group there.


In 1900, the Reese family moved to Memphis where she becameactive in the Federation of Women's Clubs as president of the NineteenthCentury Club. She used her experience in the women's clubs of Memphis tobecome active in the political problems of her day and worked forsuffrage. She led the fight for women on the Memphis City Board ofEducation and was one of the first two women elected to the Board,running for the office on the Non-Partisan ticket. While on the schoolboard, she fought for free textbooks and anti-child labor laws.


Lulu Reese was in Nashville at the Hermitage Hotel in August,1920 when the 19th amendment was passed. She was active in the NationalAmerican Woman Suffrage Association as well as the National Women'sParty.

spouse: Reese, Isaac (*1853 - )
Colyar, Martha Clarissa (1838 - 1893) - female
b. 1838
d. 1893 in New York

father: Colyar, Alexander (~1790 - 1856)
mother: Sherrill, Katherine (Kate) Sevier (1795 - )
[Colyer.FTW]


Two Daughters of
Tennessee
By GILBERT R. ADKINS


Franklin County Historical


MARTHA COLYAR: MRS. ROSEBORO'


It was natural that Martha Clarissa Colyar should regard Franklin County- a refuge in time of trouble. She was born here. the twelfth of thirteenchildren. on April 20.1834, while her parents were temporarily living ina portion of Franklin County that is now in Coffee County. Because shethought herself so excellently educated she maintained that instructionin Tennessee was the beat in the country, and she was intensely fond ofWinchester and its schools all her life. Her undated diploma from theWinchester Female Academy1 signed by Jno. G. Biddle. J.W. Tyler. P.S.Decherd. and F.A. Foughmiller. was a treasured keepsake.(2)
Samuel Reed Roseboro, who prepared for the ministry at college inLebanon. was born in Lincoln County. son of John Alexander Roseboro (3)The family was one of obvious substance, generosity, and culture It wasin Winchester that Samuel saw Martha Colyar for the first time. when theypassed on a sidewalk. True to his Presbyterian background. Samuel claimedhe was not swayed by Martha's attractively fussy clothes, sapphire blueeyes. or faint violet perfume: it was the look on her face, "as if shehad just left off prayer." Later, when they became well acquainted, heasked her to share his manse In Selma, Alabama Martha objected on theground that a devout Method let with an appetite for the fiction of SirWelter Scott should not be the wife of a Presbyterian minister who drewthe line at poetry of Pope and Shelley. The courtship neverthelessprogressed toward wedding plans after settlement of a difference ofopinion about the officiating clergy-


_ 32


man's denomination.


Miss Martha (Mattie) Colyar1 whose parents were dead, married ReedRoseboro' on January 8, 1857, near Winchester, In the humble surroundingsof an unpainted country home on the aide of a hill. Martha was clutchinga Scott novel as the couple left for a short journey down the MississippiRiver. Reed and Mattie returned to live in Pulaski, Tennesee. Dr. Houstonby request had omitted the word "obey" from their marriage ceremony,(4)and It was whispered among the women that Martha, "with that Colyar1ook111 told her beat Winchester friend, Lou Murrell, that she wouldnever accept a letter addressed to Mm. S.
R. Roseboro'. She Insisted on her Identity as Mrs. Martha ColyarRoseboro', a radical position at the time.(5) Her husband signaledcapitulation by buying his wife a eat of the Waverley novels.


In those prewar years, Martha, an emancipationist, goaded her husband onwhat to say in his slavery sermons. He occasionally took a walk In orderto get away from the barrage only to return four hours later and haveMartha pick up at her monologue's breaking-off point. Reed and thePulaski neighbors listened while Mat talked. She actually kept a bluenotebook in which she recorded what he said he thought he had said onslavery from the pulpit. Martha Was successful In radicalizing herhusband on the Issue, although he had presumably heard silmilar argumentsfrom his seminary professor. Because of Martha's suasion, her husbandconsented to move to Missouri, and when war came, Martha refuged toMattoon, Illinois, while the minister enlisted
as chaplain on the Union side The Yankee enlistment resulted In hisparents disowning him.(6)


POSTWAR RNANCIAL STRAITS


When the war w- over, Martha Colyar Roseboro fled a cramped Illinoishotel room and returned to family and friends in Tennessee. Herchaplain-husband was discharged from the United States Army on July
33


_ 34
12, 1865, and joined his wife in 8 round of visits to relatives The triphad to be brief because Mr. Roseboro had already been appointed pastor ofa Congregational church in Macon, Missouri. Mrs. Roseboro, that fail, putdown roots by purchasing a small Missouri farm with money earned duringthe war from teaching school, sewing, and working in a hotel at Mattoon,Illinois in part because of this investment, by the spring of 1868 theyoung family was financially distressed. and Martha made plans to returnto Tennessee to consult her brother, for If he could not help personallyhe would at least advise her. "Arthur", she said, "has a genius aboutmoney." Foremost in Martha's mind was the hope that Arthur would helpwith her daughter's education.
Martha had not received a letter from Arthur Colyar since her last visit,nor had she heard from her friends in Winchester. Whether incommunication or not1 relatives have a way of sensing inopportune timesfor visits. Colonel Colyar was attempting to effect governmental reformin Nashville by openly striking the Alden ring1(7) and he well knew thatpublic reaction to his entertaining a sister with abolitionist sympathiescould be damaging. To get Martha out of Nashville he planned asightseeing trip to his Sewanee Mine. From them he would urge that shevisit relatives in Coffee County while he returned to Nashville
In later life Martha's daughter, Viola1 described Tennessee as itappeared that day she and five relatives rode a train toward Cowan.


Our part of Tennessee had escaped the worst of war's ravages All overthe wide south the fallen walls of houses heaped around gaunt. Smokelesschimneys standing straight in desolate dignity made the land strange tothe eyes. Strange one would think, to the very birds who were flying sobusily in the sky: but here in middle Tennessee, many a man came back toa home little altered: the old roof still stood, and still sheltered hisown people; his own fields lay about him, and it was a striking evidenceof the metaphysical character of life that these accustomed and solidrealities often but sharpened in men's souls the sense of ruinousrevolution , and made the glowing sunlight glare the stranger in theireyes.


By contrast, the same trip between Nashville and Cowan had ImpressedMartha Roseboro as leading through an exhausted and poverty-stricken partof Tennessee; as she recalled it, innumerable signs of military conflictscarred the earth.
In addition to observing the countryside, there was ample opportunityduring the ride for Martha to register objection to her brothers hiring


_ 35


convict labor in the Sewanee Mines. Arthur Colyar reacted with assumedcheer, pointed out that he had started operations at Moffat, Tracy City,and beyond1 in order to help the state, and that the business would soonbe on a firmer basis. Recovery was underway from the twin setbacks of warand the outlay of almost two million dollars over a six-year period forrailroad construction up Sewanee Mountain to Tracy, during which thecompany received no monetary return whatsoever. Colyar referred to hiscompany railroad from Cowan as "that darling line of track," and remarkedthat "already them are summer boarders living up on that high perch ofours."
At Cowan there was a primitive ticket office. Colyar led his party peg itwith a wave to his employee, the structure's lone occupant, and followeda sooty trainman down the tracks, the rest of the party walking withdifficulty over the rough. At last they entered a queer little car thatnevertheless had cushioned mats. There was a tin cooler marked "liquidice water" and a chained, nickel-plated cup "all in grimy completeness."A mountaineer in blue homespun and strew hat who had been down into thevalley was mated next to an old woman in a bonnet. In whispers ColonelColyar told his niece a story about another old mountaineer who thoughtthem was a devil inside the company's train engine, and it was the devilthat made the train climb.


Almost immediately we found ourselves ascending the mountain --our littlecar clinging to a long empty coal train that. in its turn. fast to thepuffing. straining locomotive as far before and above us. it climbed azigzag track up '. mountainside. The sight was a novel one and to thoseOf our number who repeatedly had crossed me Sierra Nevada and the RockyMountains. giving, as if felt a startlingly distinct Impression ofclimbing.


The trip into the mines never took place. Tracy City had received atelegraphic message that Colonel Colyar was needed in Nashville. Hedeparted while his wife, Agnes,(1O) and relatives scattered to CoffeeCounty. Martha returned to penury in Missouri. A second daughter born toher did not survive infancy.

spouse: Roseboro, Samuel Reed (*1830 - 1896)
- m. 7 JAN 1857 in Franklin Co., Tennessee

----------child: Roseboro, Viola (1857 - 1945)
Colyar, Mary (1828 - ) - female
b. 1828

father: Colyar, Alexander (~1790 - 1856)
mother: Sherrill, Katherine (Kate) Sevier (1795 - )
spouse: Wileman, Levi R. (*1826 - )
- m. 12 JAN 1853 in Franklin Co., Tennessee

Colyar, Nancy (1826 - ) - female
b. 1826

father: Colyar, Alexander (~1790 - 1856)
mother: Sherrill, Katherine (Kate) Sevier (1795 - )
spouse: Elkin, Robert (1827 - )
- m. 1 JAN 1857 in Franklin Co., Tennessee

Colyar, Sarah (1836 - 1908) - female
b. OCT 1836
d. 12 AUG 1908

father: Colyar, Alexander (~1790 - 1856)
mother: Sherrill, Katherine (Kate) Sevier (1795 - )
spouse: Houston, Rev.William (1836 - 1918)
- m. 24 DEC 1860 in Franklin Co., Tennessee

----------child: Houston, Arthur (*1869 - )
----------child: Houston, Caleb Pfifer (*1869 - )
----------child: Houston, William (*1869 - )
----------child: Houston, Ina (*1869 - )
----------child: Houston, May (*1869 - )
----------child: Houston, Kate (*1869 - )
----------child: Houston, Nan (*1869 - )
spouse: Houston, William (*1834 - )
- m. 24 DEC 1860 in Franklin Co., Tennessee

----------child: Houston, Arthur (*1868 - )
----------child: Houston, Elbert (*1868 - )
----------child: Houston, Caleb (*1868 - )
----------child: Houston, Rubin (*1868 - )
----------child: Houston, Myrtle (*1868 - )
----------child: Houston, Claude (*1868 - )
Colyar, Sarah (1840 - 1908) - female
b. 1840
d. 12 AUG 1908

father: Colyar, Alexander (~1790 - 1856)
mother: Sherrill, Katherine (Kate) Sevier (1795 - )
spouse: Houston, Rev.William (1836 - 1918)
- m. 24 DEC 1860 in Franklin Co., Tennessee

----------child: Houston, Elbert (*1871 - )
----------child: Houston, Rubin (*1871 - )
----------child: Houston, Myrtle (*1871 - )
----------child: Houston, Claude (*1871 - )
Colyar, Susan (1835 - ) - female
b. 1835

father: Colyar, Alexander (~1790 - 1856)
mother: Sherrill, Katherine (Kate) Sevier (1795 - )
This husband and wife are cousins. James Lashbrook's mother was UrsulaColyar sister to Alexander Colyar
spouse: Lashbrook, James Wesley (*1823 - )
- m. 26 AUG 1856 in Franklin Co., Tennessee

Colyar, Susan (1835 - ) - female
b. 1835

father: Colyar, Alexander (~1790 - 1856)
mother: Sherrill, Katherine (Kate) Sevier (1795 - )
spouse: Lashbrook, James Wesley (*1823 - )
- m. 26 AUG 1856 in Franklin Co., Tennessee

Colyar, Thomas (~1750 - ) - male
b. ABT. 1750

Colyar, Wallace E. (1849 - ) - male
b. 1849

father: Colyar, Arthur St. Clair (1818 - 1907)
mother: Estill, Agnes Erskine (1826 - 1885)
Colyar, William (1754 - 1819) - male
b. 1754 in Greenbriar Co., Virginia
d. 1819 in Pulaski county kentucky

father: Collier, John (1707 - 1759)
mother: Meredith, Elizabeth (*1717 - )
Some researchers have expounded on this William Colyar's full name as"William J.P. Colyar" . This researcher suspects this is misguidedhaving been pulled from references in certain court documents inWashington County TN referring to William Colyar of 1754's son, WilliamColyar. William Colyar Jr. , who lived in Washington County TN was ajustice of the peace there. Some documents refer to him as WilliamColyar JP.......I think referring to his office and this may have beenmisinterpreted and attributed to his father as his name.


THE A.E. HART BOOK THE "RICHARD CALLOWAY FAMILY" IN SPEAKING OF JOHNCOLLIER OF 1742 WHO WAS MARRIED TO GRIZZELDA TAYLOR, SAID THAT JOHN OF1742'S FATHER WAS A JOHN COLLIER A PROSPEROUS PLANTER. THAT WOULD HAVEBEEN JOHN COLLIER OF 1707. IT SAYS THAT JOHN OF 1707 HAD MANY SONS ANDDAUGHTERS, ONE OF WHICH WAS A WILLIAM (THIS WOULD BE WILLIAM OF 1754)MOVED TO TENNESSEE AND WAS LOST TO ALL KNOWLEDGE OF THE KINDRED. THISIS THE ONLY INDICATION OF WHO WAS WILLIAM OF 1754'S FATHER I HAVE FOUND.HOWEVER IT IS BORN OUT BY THE SEVERAL INDICATORS. FIRST THEQUESTION OF WHY WOULD JOHN OF 1707'S WILL NOT INCLUDE THIS CHILDWILLIAM IF HE WAS IN FACT A CHILD. THE REASON WAS THAT JOHN OF 1707'SWILL WAS DRAWN IN 1746 BEFORE WILLIAM OF 1754 WAS BORN, AS WAS THECASE OF ANOTHER DOCUMENTED CHILD OF JOHN OF 1707---MARY....WHO THEVIRGINIA COUSINS BOOK SAYS WAS BORN IN 1756. NOTE THAT THIS JOHN OF 1707DIED IN 1759. IF IN FACT WILLIAM COLYAR'S FATHER WAS JOHN COLLIER OF1707, IT MAKES SINCE THAT WILLIAM MAY HAVE LEFT AND GONE TO TENNESSEELOSING ALL CONTACT WITH HIS VIRGINIA COLLIER RELATIVES, FOR HE WOULD HAVEBEEN BUT 5 YEARS OLD WHEN HIS FATHER DIED AND BUT 10 WHEN HIS MOTHERDIED.


WILLIAM COLYER from Dean Hunter Lexington Ky gedcom:


WILLIAM COLYER of Greenbriar County, Virginia was living
in Montgomery County, Virginia in the neighborhood of Roanoke,
married a woman named St.Clair and had several sons, among
them JOHN COLYER. Some of these sons of William Colyer were
killed by Indians on the frontier of Virginia and in Kentucky. From aletter from Dr. Welby Colyer (a son of St.Clair Colyer) of Garrett, Ill.,1937, who died in 1940; Delia Colyer Powers, his sister, said that Dr.Welby Colyer had two daughters. A letter from Dr. Dr. Welby Colyer wasfound in a library in Salisbury, N. C. said that a Mrs. Bales inPennington Gap, Virginia, said that William Colyer married a St.Clairwoman and said that it was on file in Abbington. . . Stella Colyer saidthat she checked and was told that the records don't go back that far.Mrs. Bales said that when CHARLES COLYER died, that a Mrs. William Colyerwas one heir. She also said that St. Clair lived in St.Clair's Bottoms,near Powell Valley, Virginia. WILLIAM COLYER owned land in WashingtonCounty, Tennessee. (Washington County, Tenn., Deeds, Vol. 17, pg. 210,Oct. 18, 1821) JOHN COLYER of Pulaski County, Kentucky to AlexanderColyer of Washington County, Tenn., . ..a11 of my share in the estate ofWILLIAM COLYER, deed., my father, to the three tracts of land inWashington County, Tennessee,on the south side of the Nolachucky River.-- This must have been JOHN'S brother, who stayed in Tennessee. Vol. 19,pg. 38, Washington Co., Deeds, April 9, 1827, . ..John Calvert and hiswife Dorcas, (formerly Dorcas Colyer of Copper County, Missouri, conveyland from the estate of her father WILLIAM COLYER, Sr. . I late ofWashington
County, Tenn. JOHN, Alexander, William and Dorcas are children of WilliamColyer. Stella Colyer


Early tax records show a WILLIAM COLYER was living on the
Nolachucky River in 1790, owned land and was paying a pole. so
he was under 50. All free white men at that time between 21
and 50 had to pay a white poll." ____-________---__-__
List of taxables for years 1791, 1792, 1793, 1794, 1797, 1798, 1799, and1801 list WILLIAM COLYER, on the Nolachucky
River, in Washington County, Tennessee.3 _____-_________-____--
WILLIAM COLYER was a Justice of the Peace in Washington
County, Tenn. in 1821.
1
. Letter from Stella Colyer to Gail Myers, April 23, 1973.
2
From Mrs. Wallace Tilden, Johnson City, Tenn. 3 . Mary H. McCowen,WASHINGTON CO. TENN. RECORDS, vol. 1, 1964


ABOVE INFO FROM GEDCOM OF CREATED BY DEAN HUNTER OF LEXINGTON KY.
__________________________________________________________________________________


email from Clark Sinclair at University of Texas at Austinsinclair@@tenet.edu dated 7/22/1998 refers to a deed book 2 page 506 entrywherein Agnes St. Clair sells her inherited share of St. Clair Bottom.This may be Washington Co. TN or Augusta Co. VA deed book
__________________________________________________________________________________
Washington County Historical Association
http://www.uriel.com/history/ironwork.htm
Embreeville Ironworks


In July 1820-a few months before Elihu's death-the Embree brothers boughta mine, forge, and 260 acres of land on the Nolichucky River inWashington County, near the mouth of Bumpass Cove. Bumpass Cove, which isabout 10 miles from Greasy Cove, seems to have been named after one IsaacBumpass who lived in Washington County before 1770. However, he does notseem actually to have owned the land. The name is sometimes spelledBumpres, Bumphers, and Bumbers [23].


Mining in Bumpass Cove started in the 1770s in a mine owned by WilliamColyer. Lead from the mines is reported to have been used to make bulletsfor the Battle of Kings Mountain in 1780. The ore was said to be so richthat it could be smelted over an open wood fire and molded into bullets[24]. In 1791 Colyer sold the property, which then consisted of 550 acresof land, to Louis Newhouse and Andrew Leuthold for 400. This andadjacent land, totaling 3,100 acres was sold in 1800 to John Sevier,Jr.-the son of General John Sevier-for $3,000. In 1812 they sold it toWilliam P. Chester who, in turn, sold it to the Embrees in 1820 for$4,500 [25]. However, Chester excluded from this sale 200 acres, whichapparently included a lead, mine.
______________________________________________________________________


Re: Military record: Ms. Janis Ragar indicated that she had info thatWilliam was a private in the 6th Virginia Regiment under Capt. SamuelHopkins. Per Richard Curtis search of 6th Virginia Regiment microfilmservice records from National Archives copy in TN state library andarchives, no William Collier/Colyer/Colyar appears 8/15/98.


In Revolutionary War Records of Mecklenburg County Virginia by KatherineB. Elliott published by Southern Historical Press, Inc., page 43 refersto a William Collier b 1753 Enlisted in Meck. Co. for 2 years under Capt.Samuel Hopkins. Re-inlisted for three years in Company of Horse underCol. Thomas Bland. Pen. S-39334.
White's Abstracts of Rev. War Pension Files Vol I page 713 shows aWilliam Collier, S39334, VA Line, appl 20 Jul 1818 Mecklenburg Cty VAaged 58 & had lived there at enl.
I looked at copy of this pension extract in TN state library andarchives 8/15/98 and noted that his man was crippled from war and had nofamily. Says he testified he was 61 6/19/1820 and after serving withHopkins re-enlisted with company of horse in regiment of Col. ThomasBland for 3 years. Says he is rough carpenter, without family andincapable of supporting himself from age and effects of wound receivedthrough his knee during war. Was placed on pension roll 7/20/1818 Cert #12731 was issued 7/22/1819. There for these records do not show directwar service of William Colyar of Washington County TN


Property: Per Dessie Simmons Johnson city TN from book North Carolinaland grants in TN 1778-1791 by Goldien Burgner pub. Southern Historical:
page 78 : 1788 grant of 130 acres North side of Nolichucky RiverWashington co. TN


page 33 grant # 882: 1789 200 acres on Bumpus creek on southside ofNolichucky. 200 acres both sides of Nolichucky river


page 34: 1790 150 acres in Bumpus cove/creek.


page 137 grant 462 to a William Collier in 1782 640 acres on southside of Red River in what is now Davidson County TN?? this one notverified as connected to William Colyer of Washington Co. TN


Per Dessie Simmons 8/8/98; many people who got these grants served in theRevolution but none of the North Carolina grants were for war service asin other states. She said that North Carolina grants were all paid forat the rate of about 50 schillinngs per 100 acres. She said that evenJohn Sevier had to pay for his land. This is confirmed by deeds I havecopies of supporting the land grants above that show that William Colyarpaid for the land in these grants.


See imaged article on Arthur St. Clair Colyar of article in Tennesseannewspaper in 1907, stating that his grandfather (William) fought in thebattle of King's mountain. I have not found William in any of theofficial lisings of soldiers at that battle, however following info fromthe National Park Service website for OverMountain Victory NationalHistoric Trails at http://www.nps.gov/ovvi/troops.htm states that "ThePatriot commanders did not keep or report official rosters of their menengaged against Ferguson at Kings Mountain. Dr. Lyman Draper's King'sMountain and its Heroes, combined with pension applications filed byveterans and theri survivors well after the battle, are the main sourcesof information about the army.


Per email from Pat Ross who works for the Bassett VirginiaHistorical library in Henry County VA, she stated per review of recordsthere these folks are recorded as having take the Oath of Allegiance inHenry County VA:


"Thomas Collier, William Collier, Charles Collier, JesseCollier...no other
spellings were listed. No date was given.


The heading was "Citizens of Henry County who took the Oath ofAllegiance"
and it stated "The General Assembly of Virginia, when The United Stateswas
in its infancy, passed an Act to oblige all free male inhabitants of the
State above sixteen years of age to give assurance of allegiance to the
same. The following is a list of those who took the oath from theoriginal
record among the files in the Clerk's Office. At the time some were away
fighting Indians, others hunting, and there were a few who refused totake
the oath." "


See the PDF documents section of this site referenced off the home pagethat says this Charles Colyer is of same family as A.S. Colyardescended. This is stated in Andrew Michaux's Travels in theTennessee Country contain reference to him in March 1796 arriving atCharles Collier's 10 miles from Jonesborough. A footnote to this commentstates that this Charles Collier was of the family from which descendedCol. Arthur St. Clair Colyar. You can see the Michaux's book in PDFsection.


This connects this Charles Colyer/Colyar to William Colyar ofWashington Cty TN. Therefore, since Charles' pension file shows hewas from Henry County VA, (see PDF section of site) it follows thatthe William Colyar showing up in Henry County VA signing an oath ofallegience there with Charles in 1777 (see PDF section fo site) isbrother to Charles. Thus it seems that the Colyer/Colyar/Coliar ofHenry County VA is in fact the family of William Colyar of WashingtonCounty TN.


The only land records I could find in Henry County VA is for a JohnColliar on Leatherwood Creek off Smith River in Henry county VA. Ibelieve this to be either brother or Father to William Colyar.


http://www.roanetn.com/Holland_early.htm
A List of the Company of Militia Under the Command of Capt. Joseph Martinin PITTSYLVANIA CO.VA 1774


Joseph Martin, Captain; John Cunningham, Lieutenant, David Chadwell,Ensign, William Cox and John Turner, Sergeants, Robert Perryman, Clerk


Benja Dillion, Carter Dillion, Henry Dillion, Edmd Lyne, Michael Barker,John Barker, Mordicai Hoard, Henry Bradbury, Robert Searcy, JohnWitt(en)?, John Stamps, WILLIAM HOLLAND, THOS HOLLAND, James Short, JamesSpencer, John Walker, Henry Tate, Nathl Tate, Edmond Graves, JosephBaker, John Palphrey, Humphry Posey, John Noe Senr, John Barker, JoelBarker, Chars Barker, Josiah Cox, Prier Noe, James Godard, WilliamDotson, Alex Jarves, Wm. Collyer, JosLaurence, Chas Foster, John Turner Geo Reaves, Daniel Smith, JosiahTurner, Wm Turner, Josh Byrd, Richd Baker, Wm Mullins Senr, WilliamMullins Junr, John Mullins, Ambrose Mullis, Wm Standly Sr, Wm StandlyJur, Richd Standly, John Standly, Saml Packwood, Baine Carter, PleasantDuke, Charles Dunkan, Wm Reed, John Goin, Richd Colliar,William Bays


The majority of information shown on these pages (other than individualcontributors as noted), comes from the writings of Snyder E. Roberts, andhis wife, Pauline Halburnt Roberts. The most frequently-quoted book ishis Roots of Roane County, TN - 1792- , published in 1981. Also his firstbook, Roberts Families of Roane County, TN, published in 1969-now out ofprint. (Reprints of Roots available from Oliver Springs HistoricalSociety)


http://www.victorianvilla.com/sims-mitchell/local/clement/mc/abb/06.htm


Note above that William Collyer in Joseph Martin Militia CompanyPittsylvania County VA 1774. Henry county was formed out ofPittsylvania County VA in 1775-1776. In "General Joseph Martin, ofVirginia, An Unsung Hero of the Virginia Frontier" found in The FilsonClub History Quarterly Vol 10 Louisville KY April 1936 No. 2 ;it says that Joseph Martin retired to his property on Leatherwood Creek( SAME AS JOHN COLLIAR ABOVE).


Volume II of Chronicles of the Scotch-Irish Settlment inVirginia--Augusta County Original Court Records 1745-1800 by LymanCHalkley. Pub. by Mary S. Lockwood, 1912......states
in VOl II page 76 Judgements. Simon Eli vs. Robert andWilliam Davis and Alexr. Wiley--O.S. 36; N.S. 12-- Bill 27th Oct 1800.In 1771 William McGhee (McGaughey) made a settlment in the Turkey Covein Powell's Valley in the present Lee County, and obtained a certificatefrom the Commissioners in 1779, etc. William Collier deposes that inthe winter and spring preceding Christian's campaign he remained at thecampt of Thomas Lovelady. William was a hunter and trapper. theIndians became troublesome and the people had to leave.


From website of Jean Colyer Grumbling: this Power of Attorney of sonAlexander Colyar (son of William) which states that William Colyar andwife Nancy may have been living in Pulaski County Kentucky at the date oftheir death :


Power of Attorney dated February 26, 1839 reads as follows:


Know all men by thesse present that I, alexander Colyear of the County ofFranklin and State of Tennessee hereby nominate, constitue and appoint myson, George T. Colyer of said county and state, my true and lawfullAttorney in fact for me and in my name to do and attend to all business Ihave any interest in in the state of Kentucky and more particularly toask for, receive from and receipt for all money coming to me from theestate of my deceased Father, William Colyear late of the County ofPulaski and state of Kentucky or from the estate of my deceased mother,Nancy Colyear of said county and state and my said Attorney is alsohereby authorized to bring suit or suits as he may think proper for therecovery of the same or to compromise the same in such way as he maythink best and to give such receipts in my name as may be necessaryhereby satisfying and confirming all the acts of my said Attorney may doin pursuance of this poser the same as if I was present and done the samemyself. Given under my hand and seal this 26th day of February 1839.
Alexander Colyear (his mark) ?
State of Tennessee
Franklin County
I, John R. Paterick(?)an acting Justice of the Peace in and for thecounty and state aforsaid hereby certify that Alexander Colyearpersonally appeared before me this day and acknowledged the within powerof Attorney to be his act and deed for the purpose therein expressed.
Given under my hand and seal this 26th day of February, 1839.
John R. Patrick
Justice of the Peace
State of Tennessee
Franklin County
I, William W. Brazelton, clerk of the County Court of said County certifythat John R. Patrick is and was at the time of making the above(unreadable) an acting Justice of the Peace in and for said County dulycommissioned, legally qualified as such and entitled to (unreadable) andcredit in all of his official acts.
In Witness whereof I have here unto set my hand and affixed my seal ofoffice at office, the 26th day of February, A.D.1839
William W. Brazelton, Clerk
State of Tennessee
Franklin County
I, Wallis Estill (?) Jr., chariman and presiding magistrate of the countycourt of said county certify that William W. Brazelton whose name issigned to the foregoing certificate is and was Clerk of said county ofthe time of signing the same and that his attestation is in due form ofLaw and sealed with the county seal. Given under my hand and seal this26th day of February A.D. 1839.
W. Estill Jr. Chairman of Franklin County Court
(followed by another certification by Will Fawcett!


Copy of Power of Attorney, now on file with Jean Colyer Grumbling.POAlocated in Book 10, Page 147.
"Tennessee" by Moore, pg. 102


Richard Curtis note: based on info in this power of attorney, itappears that William Colyar and his wife Nancy had gone to live withtheir son John Colyer living in Pulaski County in the region of BuckCreek and Cumberland River in Jugornot Hollow. It appears that Williamdied and Nancy died there. John had deeds to about 750 acres at least inthat area. He sold it to his first born son, Bluford Colyer in 1842after having moved up Pittman creek to Ruth. My guess is that Isuspect that this power of attorney that Alexander, John's brother,filed in 1839 coincided with the death of his mother Nancy Ann St. ClaireColyar. William is reported to have died 20 years earlier in 1819. Theyhad likely gone to live with their most financially secure son,John....who like his father William had amassed land along a river likelyin search of mineral rights. Not finding much, John was farminginstead in this very mountainous region. The only flat tillable land inthe area was the jugornot Hollow off what is now highway 769 leading toBuck Creek boat dock. John's other brother Alexander had migrated fromEast TN to Franklin County TN (winchester) and was farming on leasedland. His house had burned down on the Nolichucky river in Jonesboro TNarea so migrated to Winchester TN. Since he had no deeded land inarea....it appears he was not financially successful. The other son ofWilliam ( William Jr.) had become a justice of the peace in Jonesboro andwas not a large land owner. So it appears John was the largest landowner by pioneering property and obtaining first deeds along thecumberland river in Pulaski county KY.

spouse: St. Clair, Agnus "Nancy" Ann (~1760 - ~1839)
- m. 30 AUG 1777 in Henry Co., Virginia

----------child: Colyar, William (1780 - 1850)
----------child: Colyer, John (1781 - 1851)
----------child: Colyer, Nancy (1782 - )
----------child: Colyer, Dorcas (1785 - 1843)
----------child: Colyer, Ursula (~1785 - 1843)
----------child: St.Clair Colyer, Arthur (1789 - )
----------child: Colyar, Alexander (~1790 - 1856)
Colyar, William (1780 - 1850) - male
b. 24 FEB 1780 in per Janis Ragar of Sedalia MO 7/29/1998
d. 17 APR 1850

father: Colyar, William (1754 - 1819)
mother: St. Clair, Agnus "Nancy" Ann (~1760 - ~1839)

Washington cty TN deeds book 18 PG 10 (per notes of Plano Tx researchergiven to Janis Ragar) shows transfer by William Colyar jr 1/12/1826 ofNegro boy named Issac about 11-12 years old to Joseph Hunter.


Same source refers to Deed BK 18 page 303 wherein William Colyer sells anegro girl about 12 years old named Hannah to Thomas j. Brown.

spouse: Nelson, Liddia (*1784 - )
----------child: Colyer, Leonard (*1815 - )
----------child: Colyer, Martin (*1815 - )
spouse:
- m. 27 OCT 1807

spouse: Unknown, Martha (*1785 - )
- m. 27 OCT 1807

----------child: Colyer, Minerva (1809 - )
----------child: Colyer, John (1811 - )
----------child: Colyer, Abraham McNeis (1812 - )
----------child: Colyer, William George Washington (1814 - )
----------child: Colyer, Josephus P. (1816 - 1819)
----------child: Colyer, George H.P. (1816 - 1816)
----------child: Colyer, Napoleon Bonaparte (1817 - )
----------child: Colyer, Patsey Augusta Emily (1821 - )
----------child: Colyer, Cassander Perrin (1823 - )
Colyar?, Richard (~1750 - ) - male
b. ABT. 1750

father: Collier, John (1707 - 1759)
mother: Meredith, Elizabeth (*1717 - )
http://www.roanetn.com/Holland_early.htm
A List of the Company of Militia Under the Command of Capt. Joseph Martinin PITTSYLVANIA CO.VA 1774


Joseph Martin, Captain; John Cunningham, Lieutenant, David Chadwell,Ensign, William Cox and John Turner, Sergeants, Robert Perryman, Clerk


Benja Dillion, Carter Dillion, Henry Dillion, Edmd Lyne, Michael Barker,John Barker, Mordicai Hoard, Henry Bradbury, Robert Searcy, JohnWitt(en)?, John Stamps, WILLIAM HOLLAND, THOS HOLLAND, James Short, JamesSpencer, John Walker, Henry Tate, Nathl Tate, Edmond Graves, JosephBaker, John Palphrey, Humphry Posey, John Noe Senr, John Barker, JoelBarker, Chars Barker, Josiah Cox, Prier Noe, James Godard, WilliamDotson, Alex Jarves, Wm. Collyer, JosLaurence, Chas Foster, John Turner Geo Reaves, Daniel Smith, JosiahTurner, Wm Turner, Josh Byrd, Richd Baker, Wm Mullins Senr, WilliamMullins Junr, John Mullins, Ambrose Mullis, Wm Standly Sr, Wm StandlyJur, Richd Standly, John Standly, Saml Packwood, Baine Carter, PleasantDuke, Charles Dunkan, Wm Reed, John Goin, Richd Colliar,William Bays


The majority of information shown on these pages (other than individualcontributors as noted), comes from the writings of Snyder E. Roberts, andhis wife, Pauline Halburnt Roberts. The most frequently-quoted book ishis Roots of Roane County, TN - 1792- , published in 1981. Also hisfirst book, Roberts Families of Roane County, TN, published in 1969-nowout of print. (Reprints of Roots available from Oliver SpringsHistorical Society)


http://www.brinkfamily.net/tree/p49.htm
The call had been directed in response to reports of British attempts tostir the Indians into active warfare against the western settlements ofthe Colonies. This campaign against the overhill Cherokees lasted a yearand involved an extended overland trek as far west as what is nowKnoxville, Tennessee. Armstead would have become knowledgeable of theCumberland Gap and Tennessee Valley during this campaign. He served underthe command of Capt James Lyon. No record of Capt Lyon's company has beenfound. Upon completing this campaign he joined the company of JosephMartin (also of Pittsylvania county) in protecting the property of thePowell Valley settlers. Joseph Martin had just two years earlierattempted to start Martin's Station in the Powell Valley and had beendriven out by hostile Indians. He had returned to Pittsylvania county andhad been instrumental in the political campaigning to initiate thecampaign against the Indians. He had left his associate John Redd inPowell Valley at Martin's station. Upon the arrival of the militia in theHolston Valley, John Redd became the sergeant major of Joseph Martin'scompany. Details of Martin's company actions in this campaign areavailable from the writings of John Redd and from the Draper Papers.Joseph Martin's orderly book from these campaigns is in the manuscriptdivision of the Library of Congress. I provide some descriptions below togive the reader a sense for the 'action' of this campaign. [Source: TheGulf States Historical Magazine, Vol I, Sept 1902, page 141.] Theopposing Indian forces were under the command of Chief Dragging Canoe. Heretreated down the Tennessee rather than engage the 1,500 men underGeneral Christian and subsequently established the Chickamaugua tribalsettlement and continued in later years to oppose the white intrusioninto Cherokee lands. As the Indians retreated before the militia severalIndian villages were burned along the tributaries of the Tennessee River.Singled out was the village, which earlier that year, had burned a whitecaptive alive. At one river crossing, believed to be the French Broad,the militia anticipating that the Indians would await the crossing andattack as they were in the water, Joseph Martin's company (30 men) wasplaced in the lead. Martin personally carried two of his ill militiaacross the river ford. Another 600 men were sent up river the eveningbefore to ford the river and be prepared to attack the Indian positions.However the Indians had fled and the crossing was uneventful. As thecrossing was made a tremendous uproar could be heard in a nearby wood andthe militia thought that this was the Indians preparing to attack. Uponinvestigating it turned out to be a frightened heard of Eastern Buffalo.On another occasion two of Martin's militiamen played a practical joke onone who was exceptionally frightened of Indians. They led him away fromhis guard post one night with stories of a strayed horse. One of the menslipped away and discharged his weapon, the other fell as if struck dead,while the first rushed toward the unnerved man crying 'Indians!' As thetwo of them rushed toward the camp, the fallen trooper, rose from behindthem and discharged his weapon, at which point the other conspirator fellas if dead, leaving the terrified picket to rush toward the camp alone toalert it to the 'Indian attack'. They had intended according to latertestimony to stop him before he got to camp, but were unable to catch himin pursuit. The 'joke' was not amusing to Gen. Christian who had the twoarrested. Martin arg ued for there release as they were good men, andeventually had to force their release at sword point. This act ofinsubordination damaged Martin's opportunities with the militia. GeneralChristians order book contains the order prohibiting the firing ofweapons at night which was issued in response to this incident. After theburning of the Indian Villages, the elderly chiefs of the Cherokee suedfor peace and the Treaty of 1777 was signed at Long Island, Tennessee.This ceded all the northeastern lands of the Cherokee Indians to theUnited States. Joseph Martin was established as Indian commissioner forthe Commonwealth of Virginia, and moved to Long Island, TN the followingyear where he lived with his Indian wife, Nancy Ward half-sister ofDragging Canoe. During the latter part of 1777, Joseph Martin, John Reddand Armstead Anderson and 80 or so militiamen were stationed at Rye Coveto guard the Powell and Clinch Valleys against Indian raids. This was asmall settlement on a plateau of the Allegany mountains. Enroute theywere ambushed by Indians under Little Fellow, while proceeding singlefile along a steep hill. One of the company was wounded by 5 or 7 balls.Later another ambush killed another militiaman. Armstead mentions anattack that killed one of his fellow militiamen. This is potentially thesame incident. It is interesting to compare John Redd's relating of thesestories to Armstead's. Clearly the similarity substantiate Armstead'spension testimony


http://www.kentuckykinfolkorganization.com/kenburksupdate.html 3/19/05
1783 deed mentions lines of Roland Horslee Birks on Goblingtown Creek
1785, he sold 100 @@ to Richard Collear. ( Goblintown Cr. is in Patrick
Co. today.)
Above two parcels of land received by patent 1 Mar 1781 as recorded in
Henry County Patents, Book D, p. 715.


http://www.kentuckykinfolkorganization.com/kenburksupdate.html
A look at Henry County records reveals, that the last mentionof Rowland Horsely Birk and wife Sarah, is in 1785 when he sold 100 acresof land "where said Burke now lives" to Richard Collier - recorded 24Mar 1785. Henry County became a county in 1777, formed fromPittsylvania County (formed from Halifax Co. 1767) so he could have beenin Pittsylvania and just the county name changed.


Colyer, Abe Thomas (*1902 - ) - male
father: Colyer, Martin Thomas (1866 - 1923)
mother: Haynes, Sarah E. (1872 - )
spouse: Burton, Callie (Calloway) (*1906 - )
----------child: Colyer, Virgil (*1937 - )
----------child: Colyer, Ozzie (*1937 - )
----------child: Colyer, Othen (*1937 - )
Colyer, Abraham McNeis (1812 - ) - male
b. 13 JUN 1812

father: Colyar, William (1780 - 1850)
mother: Unknown, Martha (*1785 - )
Colyer, Adaline (1901 - ) - female
b. 1901

father: Colyer, Cyrenius E. (1861 - 1934)
mother: Wood, Florence E. (1874 - 1970)
spouse: Crawford, John Leland (1897 - )
----------child: Crawford, James Leland (1935 - )
Colyer, Add G. (1886 - ) - male
b. 1886

father: Colyer, John Perry (1857 - 1936)
mother: Tate, Dora Elizabeth (1859 - 1918)
Colyer, Add N. (1897 - ) - male
b. 1897

father: Colyer, Lindsay (1844 - 1930)
mother: Stogsdell, Lucinda Randall (1855 - 1913)
According to Cliva Colyer Martin 06/2005 who lives in Jugornot HollowPulaski County TN, she said that Ad Colyer ran the grocery store foryears that was at Ruth Kentucky.

Colyer, Addie (1899 - ) - female
b. 1899

father: Colyer, Martin Thomas (1866 - 1923)
mother: Haynes, Sarah E. (1872 - )
Colyer, Alice (*1858 - ) - female
father: Colyer, Lindsay (1821 - 1901)
mother: Richardson, Nancy Jane (1829 - 1871)
Colyer, Alice (1870 - ) - female
b. 1870

father: Colyer, Lindsay (1821 - 1901)
mother: Richardson, Nancy Jane (1829 - 1871)
Colyer, Aliene (1907 - ) - female
b. 1907

father: Colyer, James Bufford (1885 - 1973)
Colyer, Aliene (*1920 - ) - female
father: Colyer, James Bufford (1885 - 1973)
Colyer, Alma (*1857 - ) - female
father: Colyer, St. Claire (1819 - 1904)
mother: Morgan, Elizabeth C. (~1832 - )
spouse: Monroe, Charles (*1853 - )
Colyer, Alma (*1857 - ) - female
father: Colyer, St. Claire (1819 - 1904)
mother: Morgan, Elizabeth C. (~1832 - )
spouse: Monroe, Charles (*1853 - )
----------child: Monroe, Pauline (*1888 - )
----------child: Monroe, Casey (*1888 - )
Colyer, Alma (*1919 - ) - female
father: Colyer, James Bufford (1885 - 1973)
mother: Sears, Allie (1887 - 1970)
Colyer, Alpha (1874 - 1970) - female
b. 9 DEC 1874 in Laurel Co., Kentucky
d. 22 SEP 1970 in Lakeland, Polk Co., Florida

father: Colyer, David Alexander (1849 - 1922)
mother: Jackson, Nancy Jane (1851 - 1930)
spouse: Austin, Edwin Stobie (1871 - 1960)
----------child: Austin, Edwin Colyer (1902 - 1903)
----------child: Austin, Horace Rosser (1904 - )
----------child: Austin, Robert Colyer (1907 - 1907)
----------child: Austin, Jackson Kennish (1911 - )
Colyer, Alta Vetrice (1919 - 1920) - female
b. 15 AUG 1919
d. 26 SEP 1920

father: Colyer, Milford Alexander Campbell (1880 - 1945)
mother: Hughes, Elizabeth Perkins (1882 - 1968)
Colyer, Andrew (*1891 - ) - male
father: Colyer, Buford Kirtley (1854 - 1920)
mother: Davis, Victoria Ella (1861 - )
Colyer, Andrew Alexander (1868 - ) - male
b. 19 NOV 1868

father: Colyer, Lindsay (1844 - 1930)
mother: Warren, Elizabeth Ann (1849 - 1876)
spouse: Hughes, Eliza (1874 - )
- m. 16 DEC 1891 in Pulaski Co., Kentucky

----------child: Colyer, Duard (1894 - )
----------child: Colyer, Ruth (1897 - )
Colyer, Andrew Buford (1900 - 1968) - male
b. 9 AUG 1900 in Pulaski Co., Kentucky
d. 5 OCT 1968 in Covington, Kenton Co., Kentucky

father: Colyer, Buford Kirtley (1854 - 1920)
mother: Davis, Elenor Victoria (1859 - 1946)
spouse: Cummins, Edna (*1905 - )
- m. 2 JAN 1926 in Bromley, Boone Co., Kentucky

----------child: Colyer, Harold (*1935 - )
----------child: Colyer, Delores (*1935 - )
Colyer, Andrew Jackson (1897 - ) - male
b. 1897

father: Colyer, John Perry (1857 - 1936)
mother: Tate, Dora Elizabeth (1859 - 1918)
Colyer, Andrew R. (1868 - ) - male
b. 1868

father: Colyer, Lindsay (1844 - 1930)
mother: Warren, Elizabeth Ann (1849 - 1876)
Colyer, Anna Virginia (1888 - 1960) - female
b. 7 FEB 1888
d. 7 MAY 1960 in Burnside, Pulaski Co., Kentucky

father: Colyer, Buford Kirtley (1854 - 1920)
mother: Davis, Elenor Victoria (1859 - 1946)
spouse: Colyer, Bruce (*1884 - )
spouse: Colyer, Bruce (*1884 - )
spouse: Barnes, Fred (*1884 - )
- m. 4 JUN 1910 in Burnside, Pulaski Co., Kentucky

----------child: Barnes, Ruth (1915 - )
----------child: Barnes, Clayton Paul (1918 - )
----------child: Barnes, Mary Ellen (1921 - )
Colyer, Arthur St. Clair Jr. (*1861 - ) - male
father: Colyar, Arthur St. Clair (1818 - 1907)
http://www.geocities.com/Nashville/Bluegrass/2867/
Tennessee History Resource Page
brought to you by James B. Jones, Jr.
Telephone: +1 (615) 896-9575


1916, Memphis. The eccentric and arrant son of millionaire Colonel A.S.Colyar of T.C.I and newspaper fame, was committed to the West TennesseeMental Hospital in Bolivar, after a hearing in Memphis presided over byJudge Tom Harsh. Colyar, despite his advantages, left a promising careeras a newspaperman working at his father's paper the Nashville Americanand at papers in Knoxville and Chattanooga. He began a history ofcarrying out confidence games. At one time he entered Mexico as the VicePresident of the United States and he carried out one fraud afteranother, as an investigative reporter during the Mary Fagan trial inAtlanta and as an evangelist preacher in Kentucky. He left a trail of badchecks. At one time, for example, he pardoned a prisoner in WestTennessee while he portrayed himself as Governor Rye in Florida. Heapparently remained in the hospital and died there, saving his family anyfurther embarrassment. Records of his trial in Memphis in July, 1916,cannot be found, perhaps the result of his family's influence. Therecords detailing his life are held at the West Tennessee Mental HealthHospital Records' Center in Bolivar are protected by privacy rights andhence may not be viewed by the general public or qualified historians.


http://www.tngenweb.org/wilson/wilson1.htm
SOME WILSON COUNTY, TENNESSEE
CHANCERY COURT LOOSE RECORDS


Abstracted by Judy Henley Phillips - Nov. 1989


This is number ONE of SEVEN files.
Several years ago I was part of a project to arrange these Wilson Countyrecords for filming by the Tennessee State Library and Archives. Theproject did not go forward because of lack of help.
These abstracts are only a portion of the records that were located in asmall vault in the courthouse. At the time of this project, there werenumerous boxes of Plea and Quarter Session records stacked in the storageroom. Those records dated to the beginning of the county and werewonderful! I understand that there is now a preservation project for theloose records in Wilson County.
These Chancery records were in numbered folders. The Clerk and Masterwanted the numbers to remain with the file. That number is located at thebeginning of these abstracts. The boxes were not all together, so thenumbers are not consecutive.
Some abbreviations I have used are: A lower case "a" for acreage andlower case "p" for poles. (Ex. 62a 5p).


1930 - 1897 July 17 - (O.I.B.) Mrs. Sallie A. COLYAR, a married woman andcitizen of Davidson Co., TN, who brings this bill by her next friend,S.B. BATES, citizen of Wilson Co., TN Against The Capital City Bank,principal office in Davidson Co., A.S. COLYAR, Jr. and J.H. ZARICOR,citizens of Davidson Co., and D.J. BARTON, of Wilson Co., TN. She andA.S. COLYAR, Jr. married in Wilson Co., TN on 29 Apr. 1891 and moved toDavidson Co. She was the owner of an interest in certain real estate inCivil District 1 of Wilson Co., TN and that a marriage contract wasexecuted in which they conveyed all her property to defdt. D.J. BARTON,as trustee, in trust for the sole and separate use and benefit of complt.Her father, Berry SCOBEY, dec'd. ... her mother Sallie B. SCOBEY ... hersister, Mary J. SCOBEY died testate ... property bounded by Wilson M.YOUNG, W.T.M. SMITH, C.C.H. BURTON, Cedar Creek, and J.E. FRAZER. Complt.had inherited 1/6 interest from her father and another 1/6 devised by hersister Mary J.... J.H. ZARICOR held the legal title to the land in trustfor A.C. BROWN.... BROWN was to deliver 15 shares of the "Nashville TysonSanitarium" ... stock in Cumberland Island Georgia Corp.... Mrs. SallieB. SCOBEY, mother of complt. died on 7 June 1897....
1890 July 2 - Will of Mary J. SCOBEY: "... my brothers Jas. B. SCOBEY andR.Y. SCOBEY ... my only sister Sallie A. SCOBEY." Wits.: J.N. TABLER;C.C.H. BURTON.


The
COURIER October 2005
Vol. XLIII, No. 3
TENNESSEE HISTORICAL COMMISSION, NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE
ARTHUR S. COLYAR, JR.: TENNESSEE'S GREAT PRETENDER
By James B. Jones, Jr., Public Historian


On August 4, 1916, Arthur S. Colyar, Jr., son of A. S. Colyar of
Tennessee journalism and industrial fame, was ordered committed to
the West Tennessee Mental Hospital near Bolivar, Tennessee. He was
known as the "Super-confidence man of Tennessee and the country at
large, acclaiming himself governor, preacher and lunatic in turn." He
scattered worthless checks and operated successfully, particularly in
the south and in Mexico. Colyar had impersonated newspaper
reporters, clergymen, governors and even the vice president of the
United States. His escapades took place all over the nation. Colyar
was closely connected with several of the most prominent families in
Memphis and Nashville. He was incarcerated after spending five
months fighting extradition to Oklahoma and Kentucky. He
explained to the press that he was held in jail by his family, who
wished to put him "away" on account of his drinking.
In early February 1914 a story in the Knoxville Sentinel
announced that Colyar had been apprehended in Raleigh, North
Carolina. He had been circulating in that city impersonating
Tennessee Governor Ben. W. Hooper "when sober, but as plain
Thompson while apparently drunk." A few years earlier Colyar had
impersonated Gov. M. R. Patterson, while on a journey across Lake
Erie from Detroit to Buffalo. There he received the formal attentions
as a result of his charade, using his borrowed persona to his financial
advantage. He impersonated Governor Tom Rye on a number of
occasions, but during the administration of Governor Ben W. Hooper
he arrived at Memphis on a steamboat in great state with a following
of kindred spirits, impersonating Governor Hooper and staff. Soon
thereafter, sans staff, he extended his role as the governor and arrived
in New York and bounced a number of checks. He was gone before
anyone was the wiser. Confidence man extraordinary, he even during
the Mexican Revolution visited Mexico purporting to be the vicepresident
of the United States. Though he crossed the Rio Grande in
state, he recrossed in haste, urged by the hostile rurales. Colyar's
adventures, however, were more amusing than remunerative.
Few men in Tennessee had broken into print with the frequency
of A. S. Colyar. According to the Knoxville Sentinel,
Few men for their age, and he is now a middle-aged man,
have been as busily engaged in getting in and out of trouble
as young Colyar. He isn't at all particular over the location
where the trouble has origin. And his adventures were as
varied as his habitat.
POLICE HOLD A. S. COLYAR read the headline in the
Chattanooga Daily Times of January 5, 1915. A. S. Colyar,
notorious throughout the country and particularly well known in
Tennessee, is again in the toils of the law. A warrant from Oklahoma
caused his arrest at a hospital where he had taken the cure the week
before. He had been drinking for a day or more until he was
physically exhausted and endangered with delirium. He was moved
to the city jail.
Colyar was about 48. According to the Times: "It is usually a
safe bet that he would play some prominent part in any criminal case
that might develop country-wide interest. Colyar insists he does not
court the limelight, but the limelight has wooed him incessantly. He
is an authority on prisons and asylums and his experience with the
authorities of the law is not altogether domestic."
He was cool as the proverbial cucumber on the night following
his arrest. He admitted to the press that the matter in Oklahoma was
most likely true. According to Colyar: "I was on a big spree in
Oklahoma, and may have given checks the banks dishonored. When
men put too much drink into their system it is very likely to result in
grand larceny of brains." His problems in Oklahoma stemmed from
his impersonating a man of the cloth as the Rev. A. S. Colyar, Jr. In
this capacity he had conned a few wealthy parishioners to invest in a
bogus clay mining/pottery manufacturing business while
simultaneously promoting a revival and then absconding with all the
receipts, to say less about passing bad checks.
While in jail he bragged about some of his connections. "Ben"
Hooper, as he familiarly referred to Tennessee's retiring chief
executive, would never embarrass him according to Colyar, because
of his links with politicos such as Newell Sanders and "Old Man" [B.
F.] Stahlman. Stahlman was an intimate of Col. Colyar, Sr., the
industrialist and journalist, and by reason of that relationship he had
frequently indulged the wayward son. Ex-U. S. Senator Newell
Sanders was likewise a good friend of a relative of Colyar, "and in
consequence evinces more than passing interest in the vagaries of the
irresponsible scamp."
In addition to these connections public men throughout
Tennessee knew Colyar well. He had pursued work in a number of
professions, most notably law and journalism. He had worked in
almost every section of the state. Once in upper East Tennessee he
was editor-in-chief of five successful weeklies, subsidized, so he
stated, in the interest of the late W. P. Brownlow. Like his adventures
in Oklahoma, Methodism, republicans and democrats, even
progressives, appeared alike to Colyar when he engaged in
characteristic, untiring "search for adventure and the piffle some
called ill-gotten gains or pelf."
Colyar was eager to tell of his lighthearted life and that he had
twice been judged insane. His character was difficult to characterize.
According to a newspaper report: "It would be difficult to find just
such a man of his character. His profuse vocabulary is of widest
extent, and amid everyday environment his cursing is spectacularly
profound. Should his auditor, however, happen to be a minister or
even a sinner, and Colyar's conversation is chaste and as elegant as
the purest, acceptable English will permit. If . his tongue slip a wee
`drat it' or `doggone' issue, he is quick with profound obeisance and
apparently abject humiliation will pray pardon for his impropriety."
He was a confidence man of no small talent.
"You cannot take me back," Colyar told the Oklahoma deputy
sent to retrieve him to face justice. I am under criminal bond to
appear before a court of this state and cannot legally be taken across
the state line. If you get requisition papers and force me to leave I
will not return and they know they cannot make me return. If this
should fail I can get any number of people to swear that I am
crazy.and everyone knows I am crazy sometimes."
Ensconced in the Hamilton County jail, he was temporarily safe
from extradition to Oklahoma. The governor would have to
determine if the admitted crazy man would remain in Tennessee or
leave for Oklahoma. The technicalities of the law seemed, for the
time being at least, to sustain his position. Colyar won the assistance
of two local judges, Floyd Estill and Lewis Shepherd, who had
agreed to prevent his extradition to Oklahoma. Judge Shepherd and
Judge Estill were prepared to fight the issuance of requisition papers
by Gov. Hooper. His hearing was set for 9 AM before City Judge
Fleming on January 7, 1915.
At the hearing Arthur S. Colyar, Jr.'s representatives initiated
habeas corpus proceedings and Colyar continued to deny the
Oklahoma charge of obtaining money under false pretenses.


According to his legal representatives the con-man was at that
time.insane and incapable of committing any crime. He has been
insane from youth up to the present time and has been repeatedly
adjudged insane in the in the courts of Tennessee and confined in
insane asylums. He is permanently insane and has no lucid intervals
that would give him the capacity to commit any crime." Additionally,
Governor Hooper had not signed the warrant, making it null and
void.
He told the history of the prisoner's father, of his service to the
Confederacy and his later life spent in Winchester and Nashville.
Colyar heard himself denounced as a degenerate without batting an
eye. Later, he joined the court and spectators in hearty laughter when
his attorney, Judge Estill, compared Colyar to a "summer coon not fit
to eat and that his hide was worth nothing."
Two days later, as he waited for the court's decision on the
habeas corpus matter, the defendant Colyar indulged in a bit of
doggerel about his plight sung to the tune of "It's a Long Way to
Tipperary:"
It's a long way to Oklahoma,
It's a long way to go;
It's a long way to Oklahoma,
To the damndest jail I know.
Good-by Chattanooga,
Dear old courthouse square,
It's a long, long way to Oklahoma
But they want me out there.
The Oklahoma authorities were disappointed. Colyar's case
was decided on legal technicalities. The Judge agreed the governor's
warrant was null and void. Colyar would escape the prospect of
going on trial in Oklahoma. But his machinations in Kentucky
suddenly had caught up with him. Immediately after being set free
Colyar was re-arrested upon the Kentucky charges.
Matt "Old Matt" Spencer, Sheriff of Breathitt county sent a
telegram to police officials in Chattanooga that Colyar was wanted
for "emmpexxlement" from the Bank of Jackson. Colyar's attorneys
quickly filed yet another petition of habeas corpus. Sheriff Spencer's
cable continued: "Hold Colyar till I get there. I'm comin' after him."
Colyar testified in his own behalf at the next day's hearing. His
testimony proved that he had "to be about the smartest man who ever
went on the witness stand here and swore that he was crazy." He was
the very caricature of a character. There was hardly a town in Florida
of any size but where some local tycoon had been bamboozled by the
Tennessee trickster and held one of the "governor's" checks. While
in Florida he successfully pardoned a prisoner in West Tennessee. As
an ersatz governor he often sent telegrams to sheriffs of Tennessee
commuting sentences, convincing his duped victims could have the
honor of filing it for him.
At New Orleans a prolonged drinking binge put him in one of
the hospitals for some time. As "Gov. Rye of Tennessee," he obtained
the finest suite and recuperated under the care of a special Crescent
City nurse. Texas was next visited, and Texans, too, were taken in
and cashed his checks on various occasions. Though he openly came
back to Chattanooga after he had exhausted his resources there, no
attempt was made to take out requisition papers for him, as the west
had had experience with him in that line. According to the Times:
His story, related on the witness stand yesterday, if reduced
to a scenario, would be a "scream" from start to finish and
would deserve the patronage of all movie fanatics. He has
been an inmate at the insane asylum in Tennessee.nine
times..He.had spent nine months in a Florida
institution, six months in the asylum in
Ohio...considerable time in an institution of that character
in Virginia and twice in Georgia asylums.
At one point of his cross-examination the prosecuting attorney
looked him in the eye and asked: "Colyar, you ain't crazy, are you?"
He replied: "You can't find a man in Lyon's View that will tell you
he is crazy."
His first visit to Lyon's View was when he was a boy, 19 years
of age. While he was nonplussed about his father placing him there,
he didn't stay long. His inclination for writing bad checks was
initiated soon after he escaped from the institution. He went directly
to Knoxville, to the supreme court room when the court was in
session, and drew a draft on his father for $10 - which his father's
friend, Chief Justice Peter Turney, cashed for him. He testified
further that he had been in similar disputes before and always won.
This, most likely due to his father's influence and acquaintance with
governors Buchanan, Taylor, McMillin, Frazier and Cox who all had
refused to honor extradition papers for Colyar
A medical expert testified that Colyar was of unsound mind, a
"moral crank with a mania for financial dealings "but expressed no
opinion on Colyar's sanity. Judge Estill, Colyar's attorney and a
childhood comrade, said that in his opinion Colyar did know right
from wrong, but did not have the power of resistance to control
himself when his mind became set on a specific goal.
The upshot was that Colyar's case was sent to the Appeals
Court in Knoxville. Apparently he won the appeal and was set free
without having to stand trial in Oklahoma, Kentucky, or even in
Franklin County, Tennessee. Yet this was only the groundwork for
the end of his story. His insanity would become less a shield from
imprisonment and more a rationale for treatment.
In July 1916 he was arrested while recuperating from excessive
alcohol consumption on charges of passing bad checks. Pronounced
insane by Memphis courts, Colyar had been confined in the state
asylum at Bolivar. The Bolivar Bulletin of August 4, 1916 remarked,
perhaps unfairly, of his incarceration:
One time city editor of the Nashville American, formerly
owned by his father, Colyar has been regarded as a man of
extraordinary though perverted talents. As a scion of one
of the most respected families in the state, with every
advantage, it has been freely said that he could have risen
to a high measure of success. It is regarded as the irony of
fate that the ground on which he had so many times evaded
the law has been used as the instrument of his downfall
and landed him behind the bars of an asylum. Many who
know Colyar predict that he will shortly be the greatest
Roman of them all in the Bolivar institution, and either
lead a successful revolt of the Napoleons, Julius Caesars,
etc., confined therein, or in some manner regain his liberty.
Whether or not he ever regained his liberty is not known, as all
records relating to his case are sealed in perpetuity. His burial site is
not known. Colyar's story is an instance of the observation that
history should be portrayed, blemishes and all. Certainly he was a
colorful character from a distinctive lineage. Yet while his lively part
in our past was marginalized due to social conventions and bygone
deference for family connections, he nevertheless played a role in the
Volunteer State's past, and Colyar's life reads much like the plot of
an. O. Henry short story, as the basis for one of his ironic, fictional
characters.

spouse: Scobey, Sallie A. (*1870 - )
- m. 29 APR 1891

Colyer, Arthur Wesley (1891 - 1965) - male
b. 14 JAN 1891 in Pulaski county kentucky
d. 1965 in Council, VA

father: Colyer, Martin Thomas (1866 - 1923)
mother: Haynes, Sarah E. (1872 - )
Per Wesley Colyer of Cinncinnati OH, Arthur Wesley Colyer worked forrailroad.
spouse: Goff, Luvada (1895 - 1921)
----------child: Colyer, Mamia Goff (*1922 - )
spouse: Burton, Cora Nell (*1894 - )
----------child: Colyer, Kenneth George (*1921 - )
----------child: Colyer, Rosie (*1925 - )
----------child: Colyer, Helen Ruth (*1925 - )
----------child: Arthur, Denny (*1925 - )
----------child: Jr., Arthur Wesley Colyer (1926 - 1944)
Colyer, Belle (*1858 - ) - female
father: Colyer, Lindsay (1821 - 1901)
mother: Richardson, Nancy Jane (1829 - 1871)
Colyer, Bertha (*1855 - ) - female
father: Colyar, Arthur St. Clair (1818 - 1907)
mother: Estill, Agnes Erskine (1826 - 1885)
Colyer, Bertha (1911 - ) - female
b. 1911

father: Colyer, Sidney Forest (1884 - )
mother: Sears, Pearl Bell (*1886 - )
Colyer, Bertha (*1922 - ) - female
father: Colyer, Sydney Forest (*1887 - )
Colyer, Bessie Jo (*1919 - ) - female
father: Colyer, Sidney Forest (1884 - )
mother: Sears, Pearl Bell (*1886 - )
Colyer, Bethel (1914 - ) - female
b. 1914

father: Colyer, Sidney Forest (1884 - )
mother: Sears, Pearl Bell (*1886 - )
Colyer, Beula M. (1894 - ) - female
b. 1894

father: Colyer, Lindsay (1844 - 1930)
mother: Stogsdell, Lucinda Randall (1855 - 1913)
Colyer, Beverly (1962 - ) - female
b. 9 JAN 1962

father: Colyer, James W. (1925 - )
mother: Burnett, Dorothy (1930 - )
Colyer, Blanche Elizabeth (1922 - ) - female
b. 25 APR 1922 in Ludlow, Kenton Co., Kentucky

father: Colyer, Milford Alexander Campbell (1880 - 1945)
mother: Hughes, Elizabeth Perkins (1882 - 1968)

About the Square Grand Piano


The Colyer family lived at 13 Locus Street in Ludlow, Kentucky whenthey bought the piano. It was purchased from neighbors named Brogans,who lived across the street from them. When the Brogans bought a newpiano, they asked Milford Colyer if he would like to buy it for tendollars. You know the rest. Dad, Uncle Woods Chestnut and the Broganstwisted the legs off the piano and carried it across the street.
Mrs. Ferguson, a friend of a neighbor (Mrs. Butcher), gave Nora pianolessons. She came to the house about once a week.

spouse: Bloemer, Harold Joseph (1912 - 1970)
- m. 3 AUG 1964 in Covington, Kenton Co., Kentucky

----------child: Bloemer, John Joseph (1967 - )
Colyer, Bluford (1809 - 1878) - male
b. 17 JAN 1809 in Virginia
d. 29 SEP 1878

father: Colyer, John (1781 - 1851)
mother: Minus, Martha (*1781 - 1816)
According to many deeds I have examined found in Pulaski County CourtHouse, Bluford bought the property that was originally patented to thisfather John Colyer along the Cumberland River and Buck Creek in about1846. Bluford later apparently lost most of the land in the JugornotArea of Pulaski County via court ordered sale as the result of lawsuit.Not sure in 2005 of nature of suit. In a any event, it appears fromdeeds that friends bought the property at auction and later transferredit back to Bluford Colyer wife--Rebecca Colyer. She owns land in thethe area until at least 1895 when she donated small lot to enable thecontruction of Jugornot school. This school , now torn down in 2005,use to site right on highway 769 (Rush Branch Road). She also gave landto son Bluford Kirtley Colyer for his home place next to other sonWilliam Colyer.
spouse: Kirtley, Rebecca (1829 - 1901)
- m. 7 DEC 1842

----------child: Colyer, John W. (1844 - )
----------child: Colyer, William M. (1846 - >1936)
----------child: Colyer, Milford (1846 - )
----------child: Colyer, James (1852 - )
----------child: Colyer, Winfield (*1853 - )
----------child: Colyer, Buford Kirtley (1854 - 1920)
Colyer, Bluford Pinctner (1871 - 1872) - male
b. 1871
d. 1872

father: Colyer, Charles Granade (1832 - 1910)
mother: Meece, Louisa Jane (1842 - 1931)
Colyer, Brenda (1955 - ) - female
b. 5 NOV 1955

father: Colyer, Noble (1931 - )
mother: Meese, Loretha (1931 - )
Colyer, Bruce (*1884 - ) - male
spouse: Colyer, Anna Virginia (1888 - 1960)
Colyer, Bruce (*1884 - ) - male
spouse: Colyer, Anna Virginia (1888 - 1960)
Colyer, Buford Kirtley (1854 - 1920) - male
b. 3 NOV 1854 in Pulaski Co., Kentucky
d. 7 AUG 1920

father: Colyer, Bluford (1809 - 1878)
mother: Kirtley, Rebecca (1829 - 1901)
According to Jugornot Hollow long time resident (family there forgenerations) Shirley Bray, June 2005, BK Colyer was known as BlufieColyer. She said he is buried in abandoned cemetery off Ponderosa Drivewhich is right off highway 769 (Rush Branch Rd) in Pulaski county nearBuck Creek Boat dock. I found his grave stone in this abandonedcemetery 06/24/05
spouse: Davis, Victoria Ella (1861 - )
----------child: Colyer, John Memes (1882 - 1925)
----------child: Colyer, Andrew (*1891 - )
----------child: Colyer, Milford (*1891 - )
----------child: Colyer, Lillith (1891 - 1925)
----------child: Colyer, Littleton (1894 - )
spouse: Davis, Elenor Victoria (1859 - 1946)
- m. 10 DEC 1878 in Scott Co.

----------child: Colyer, Milford Alexander Campbell (1880 - 1945)
----------child: Colyer, Rebecca Davis (1885 - 1956)
----------child: Colyer, Anna Virginia (1888 - 1960)
----------child: Colyer, Lillith Cephas (1891 - 1925)
----------child: Colyer, Littleton Wheeler (1894 - 1947)
----------child: Colyer, Andrew Buford (1900 - 1968)
Colyer, Buford Wesley (1860 - 1935) - male
b. 29 JAN 1860
d. 5 AUG 1935

father: (J.P.), James Perry Colyer (1828 - )
mother: Silvers, Mary Susan (1841 - 1920)
according to Cliva Colyer Martin 2005, grand-daughter of Buford WesleyColyer.....Wes is buried at Wesley Chapel in the Jugornot area of Pulaskicounty.
spouse: Barnes, Melinda (1864 - 1930)
----------child: Colyer, Perry Lee (1893 - 1958)
----------child: Colyer, Mary Rachel (1898 - 1948)
----------child: Colyer, Sula (1900 - 1933)
----------child: Colyer, Vena (1903 - 1988)
Colyer, Carter (*1759 - ) - male
father: Collier, William (1724 - 1815)
mother: Carter, ? (*1728 - )
Colyer, Cassander Perrin (1823 - ) - female
b. 18 SEP 1823

father: Colyar, William (1780 - 1850)
mother: Unknown, Martha (*1785 - )
Colyer, Charles (1757 - ~1840) - male
b. 1757 in Fauquier Co., Virginia
d. ABT. 1840 in Rockcastle Co., Kentucky

father: Collier, John (1707 - 1759)
mother: Meredith, Elizabeth (*1717 - )


Miss Alice colyer Gala of Louisville Ky on 8/1/98 stated that she hadinformation learned from books in the Louisville Filson club libraryabout Virginia in Revolutionary War.


She states that her info says that a Charles Colyer was born in FauquierCo. Virginia and Enlisted in the Military in Henry Co. Virginia after thewar. That he lived in Washington Co. Tn, Pulaski Co. Kentucky then RockCastle Co. Kentucky. He applied for a pension in 1834. Hisrevolutionary war number for pension was S30967. Alice thinks that thiswas Williams brother. Rock Castle is very close to Pulaski county.Genological abstracts of Revolutionary files Vol I A-D by White.


White's extract as follows:
"Colyer, Charles, S30967, VA Line, sol was b in Dec 1757 Fauquier Cty VA& enl in Henry Cty VA & after the war sol lived in VA & in TN that partwhich later became Washington Cty TN then moved to Pulaski Cty KY then toRockcastle Cty KY & appl there 30 Jul 1834."


Correspondence from National Archives re: Charles Colyer record in letterdated Aug 5, 1930 to Mr. Ben Reeves of Branesville GA from actingcommissioner of archives E.W. Morgan he states that:
" He enlisted in Henry County, Virginia, in 1779 or 1780, served asa private under Captain Cunningham guarding the frontiers and scoutingafter the Indians, and was wounded in an engagement on Holston River by aball from a pistol passing through his left side, length of this servicenot less than three months.


He enlisted in the summer of 1781, exact date not given, served as aprivate in Captains James Shelton's and Rice's Virginia Companies, wasstationed as a guard at Prince Edward Court House. A part of the time,length of this service not less than four months.


In the Fall of the year after the siege of Yorktown, exact date notstated, he was appointed by Colonel Love to range the frontier countrynear the Tennessee line against the Indians and served three months."Examination of copies of the handwritten affidavit in 1834 for pensionapplication shows that Richard Colyer, a clergyman, testified to CharlesColyer's character and stories of his service in Revolutionary War.This Richard Colyer said that he had known Charles Colyer for some 30years. This is same Richard Colyer, clergy , that also testifies onbehalf of Grizzy Colyer (widow of John Colyer of 1744) for pension.


http://www.mdslavery.net/html/research/slavebuy.html
Dorchester County, MD Slave Purchasers, 1823-1836
Colyer Charles Rock Castle Co., KY DORCHESTER COUNTY COURT (ChattelRecords), 1827-1833


Affidavit by Jesse Brock, dated 14 Oct, 1836, stating that he gave powerof attorney to Charleton Hurt of
Lexington and that his original pension certificate hadbeen lost or stolen while in the possession of Mayor
Charles Colyer of Mount Vernon.
- continuation of affidavit by Jesse Brock
- Affidavit by James Henderson stating he drew up thepower of attorney for Jesse Brock to Charleton Hunt
and gave it to Mayor Charles Colyer and that it waseither lost or stolen. signed John H. Slaughter
- Affidavit by Mayor Charles Colyer of Rockcastle Co.,KY, date 8 Nov 1836, states: He was given the
pension certificate of Jesse Brock along with the powerof attorney for Charleton Hunt. Sometime after
seeing Mr. Hunt his pocket book was either lost orstolen which contained the original certificate. signed
John H. Slaughter


See the PDF documents section of this site referenced off the homepage that says this Charles Colyer is of same family as A.S. Colyardescended. This is stated in Andrew Michaux's Travels in theTennessee Country contain reference to him in March 1796 arriving atCharles Collier's 10 miles from Jonesborough. A footnote to this commentstates that this Charles Collier was of the family from which descendedCol. Arthur St. Clair Colyar. You can see the Michaux's book in PDFsection concerning John Colyers of Washington County.


This connects this Charles Colyer/Colyar to William Colyar ofWashington Cty TN. Therefore, since Charles' pension file shows hewas from Henry County VA, it follows that the William Colyar showing upin Henry County VA signing an oath of allegience there with Charles in1777 (see PDF section fo site) is brother to Charles. Thus it seemsthat the Colyer/Colyar/Coliar of Henry County VA is in fact the family ofWilliam Colyar of Washington County TN.

spouse: Renfro, Mary (*1761 - )
Colyer, Charles A. (1881 - ) - male
b. 1881

father: Colyer, Charles Richard (1836 - 1903)
mother: Richardson, Susannah (1845 - 1916)
Colyer, Charles B. (1877 - ) - male
b. 1877

father: Colyer, Lindsay (1844 - 1930)
mother: Bray, Amanda Catherine (1859 - )
Colyer, Charles C. (*1857 - ) - male
father: Colyer, St. Claire (1819 - 1904)
mother: Morgan, Elizabeth C. (~1832 - )
Colyer, Charles C. (1869 - ) - male
b. 1869

father: Colyer, St. Claire (1819 - 1904)
mother: Morgan, Elizabeth C. (~1832 - )
Colyer, Charles C. (1887 - ) - male
b. 1887

father: Colyer, William M. (1846 - >1936)
mother: Lewis, Amy H. (1860 - 1943)
Colyer, Charles Eve (1786 - 1876) - male
b. 3 JAN 1786 in Scott Co., Virginia
d. 13 AUG 1876 in Rockcastle Co., Virginia

father: Colyer, John Jr. (1744 - 1836)
mother: Taylor, Grizelda (1754 - 1846)
spouse: Renfro, Mary (Polly) (1775 - 1832)
----------child: Colyer, Stephen Dearborn (1814 - 1861)
----------child: Colyer, Parmelia (1816 - )
----------child: Colyer, Martha (1818 - )
----------child: Colyer, Nathan Renfro (1820 - 1843)
----------child: Colyer, David Taylor (1822 - 1869)
----------child: Colyer, Mary Polly (1825 - 1828)
----------child: Colyer, Chloe (1827 - 1828)
----------child: Colyer, Dorcus (1830 - 1903)
Colyer, Charles Eve (1854 - 1946) - male
b. 27 DEC 1854 in Knox Co., Kentucky
d. 23 MAY 1946 in Torrington, Goshen Co., Wyoming

father: Colyer, Stephen Dearborn (1814 - 1861)
mother: Hogan, Olivia Jane Johnston (1829 - 1902)
spouse: Cobb, Minerva (1857 - 1937)
Colyer, Charles F. (1898 - ) - male
b. 17 APR 1898

father: Colyer, Martin Thomas (1866 - 1923)
mother: Haynes, Sarah E. (1872 - )
Colyer, Charles G. (1869 - 1956) - male
b. 1869
d. 1956

father: Colyer, Charles Granade (1832 - 1910)
mother: Meece, Louisa Jane (1842 - 1931)
From Mrs. Sherrie White, Fort Worth Texas: 7/3/03


I remember Mama telling me that my Pawpaw (Charles G. Colyer II) taught
school in Kentucky in a one-room school house. She had a handbell that he
used to call the children to school with and a photo of his class. Idon't
know exactly where the picture is right now, but I will look for it.Also,
the bell used to be in Mama's cedar chest, but when we were cleaning outthe
house after both of our parent's deaths, we couldn't find the bell. We
don't know what happened to it. We were all very upset about that,because
we all had heard about the history behind it and wanted to keep it. We
think our Dad may have taken it out at some time and lost it or gave it
away. He suffered from dementia before his death. Anyway, Mama saidthat
Pawpaw also taught here in Texas after he moved here. He taught in asmall
community west of Fort Worth, but I don't know which one or if it is still
there. I do have a wooden box that he ordered from the Baker ChocolateCo.
to show his students what cocoa beans looked like! After teaching for a
time, he started working for the Rock Island R.R. Co. I believe he worked
there until he retired. He and Granny lived on the next street over from
ours and we would walk over to their house.
They are both buried at Mount Olivet Cemetery in Ft. Worth, but I
have never seen their graves. My mother never took us there to seethem. I
didn't know about Sam's child dying here. I suppose it is possible thathe
could be buried at Mount Olivet too. Hopefully, we can find out. I think
it is interesting that teaching was so prevalent in the Colyer family. I
too was a teacher. I taught first grade for several years, then quit to
start my family. After that, I didn't have the desire to go back to it. I
recently found out that Granny and Pawpaw's graves had no markers or
gravestones. I don't know the reason for this, but my brother found this
out when they were there a couple of years ago for another funeral and
decided to look them up. They were instructed where to go to find the
graves, but were astonished to find no gravestones. We would like tochange
that in the future.

spouse: Cargill, Marie Frances (*1881 - )
----------child: Colyer, Helen Marie (1919 - )
spouse: Hancock, Ollie B. (*1871 - )
- m. ABT. 1884

----------child: Colyer, Lorine Colyer (~1906 - 1992)
----------child: Colyer, Eugene (~1908 - )
Colyer, Charles Granade (1832 - 1910) - male
b. 8 AUG 1832 in Pulaski Co., Kentucky
d. 11 APR 1910 in Somerset, Ky

father: Colyer, John (1781 - 1851)
mother: Purvis, Lydia Memes (1798 - 1874)

(from Dean Hunter gedcom files)
CHARLES GRENADE COLYER AND LOUISA JANE MEECE COLYER


CHARLES GRENADE COLYER was born August 8, 1832, in Pulaski County,Kentucky, the son of JOHN COLYER and LYDIA PURVIS. He grew up on hisfather's farm on Pitman Creek in eastern Pulaski County. C. G. COLYERmarried LOUISA JANE MEECE, July 14, 1861, in Pulaski County, Kentucky.LOUISA JANE MEECE, was born August 21, 1842, in Pulaski County,Kentucky, daughter of EPHRIAM MEECE and MATILDA RICHARDSON MEECE.
Sam Colyer, son of C. G. COLYER, stated that his father enlisted in theConfederate Army, when he heard that he was to be drafted into the UnionArmy within a few days.


Pension Records1


The records show that C. G. COLYER, private, Company C, 6thKentucky Cavalry, Confederate States
Army1 enlisted January 24, 1863; as C. J. COLYER, private,Company G, said regiment, was captured at Cripple Creek, Tennessee,May 14, 1863; was paroled at Fort McHenry, Maryland, May 29, 1863, andwas received City Point, Virginia, May 31, 1863.
The name of one C. G. COLYER, sergeant, Company E, Detachment of variousRegiments of Morgan's Cavalry Division appears on muster roll ofCompany E and H of that organization for December 31, 1862, to August 31,1863 (only payroll on file), on which he was reported present and to haveenlisted January 1, 1863. No later record of him has been found.


C 6 Cav Ky2 Confederate
C. G. COLYER Pvt., Capt. M. B. Perkins' Company,
Grigsby's Reg't, Kentucky Cav.*
Appears on
Company Muster Roll of the organization named above for Nov. 1, 1862 toFeb 28 , 1863
Enlisted: Jan 24, 1863
Where: Beech Grove, Tenn.
By whom: Capt. Perkins
Period: Three years
Last Paid: Never Paid
Present or absent: Present
Remarks: Volunteered for the unexpired term of the
Company


*This company subsequently became Company C, 6th Regiment, KentuckyCavalry


The regiment was formed about February 1, 1863, by the consolidation ofGrigsby's and Bullitt's Battalions Kentucky Cavalry.


PRISONERS OF WAR
C 6 Cav Ky
Confederate
C.J. COLYER
Appears on a register:
Dept of the Cumberland, Reg. No.1
(Hd. Qrs. Prov. Mar. General, Nashville, Tenn.
To what point forwarded: Louisville, May 28


Received at Military Prison, Louisville, Ky., May 23,
1863, from penitentiary at Nashville, Tenn.
Roll dated May 23, 1863.


Where taken: Cripple Creek, Tenn., May 14, 1863
Remarks: Sent to Baltimore, May 25, 1863.
-Louisville, Ky., Register No.1; page 232-


Sent May 25, from Louisville, Ky., to Baltimore, Md., en route to beexchanged.


paroled at Fort McHenry, Md., May 29, 1863
-Roll bears the following endorsement:
"Received City Point, Va., May 31, 1863, from Jno. E. Mulford, Capt., 3dInfty. N. Y. V., Comdg. Flag of Truce, One Hundred & thirty six (136)Confederate prisoners of War paroled for exchange of 1 Surgeon - J.B.Thompson, Capt. Comd., Post City Point.


_Roll of Company C, Sixth Regiment Cavalry3
CONFEDERATE
This roll lists sixty members. There are twelve Colyers andthree Earps from Pulaski County, Ky. Number 24 on the roll is C. J.Colyer (Charles Grenade Colyer). He was listed this way on severalrolls.
"Roll dated Beech Grove, Tenn.1 Feb. 28, 1863. This company wasorganized in Pulaski County, Ky.; was engaged in constant picketing andscouting in Pulaski and Rockcastle Counties; went into camp at Beaufort,near Danville, Ky. Company participated in action at Murfreesboro,Tenn. Dec. 31, 1862. Note--The "Old Roster" 6th Kentucky Cavalry callsthis Company "C" and rolls on file are marked Company "A". This companywas mustered into service as Company "C" of 6th KY. Cavalry and wasalways recognized and known as such in regimental organization. In thefirst days of March 1863, General Buford was assigned to the MississippiDept. and the 6th Regiment Ky. Cavalry and the 5th Reg. Ky. Cavalry werethen transferred to the command of Brigadier General John H. Morgan, withwhich it continued in service until nearly the whole regiment wascaptured during the last days of Morgan's Ohio raid."


Sam Colyer, further stated, that CHARLES GRENADE COLYER was in the battleof Chickamauga near Chattanooga, Tenn. He was in the Confederate Cavalryand every fourth man was to
be a horse holder during the battle. Both C. G. COLYER and Morgan Colyerwere fourth when they were numbered and were assigned to hold horsesduring the battle. C. G. COLYER
placed his horses between him and the battle and Morgan, his brother,laid down face toward the battle. As the bullets and shells came aroundthem, Morgan said "Oh Lord, Oh Lord".
C.G. said "are you hit?". Morgan said "No, just scared."
At Chickamauga the cavalry was told to hold the Union Army while theConfederate Army retreated across the river. They held long enough forthe army to cross and then the General said, "every man for himself."Charles G. was going along the river when two Union soldiers saw him andchased him. They apparently were out of ammunition or their guns weren'tloaded since they didn't fire. After a couple of miles Charles G. gotto a large tree across the trail and decided to try to have his horsejump the tree. The horse jumped it, but the Union soldiers didn't jumpit and Charles G. got away and was able to cross the river.
He had enlisted for a specific time and after the time expired and nearthe end of the was and it was known the cause was lost, he went toheadquarters and was given an honorable discharge.
CHARLES GRENADE COLYER could not return home since there were somany Yankee supporters who would shoot returning "Rebs". He stayedin Nashville about two years and ran a hotel. A neighbor named Gilmore,harassed his wife, mother and his small son, because C. G. had been inthe Confederate Army. Gilmore killed their chickens and the pets andtold them that C. G. had been killed. LOUISA JANE, his wife, told hemshe did not believe it. Finally Charles G. returned home and vowed tokill Gilmore. C. G. was splitting wood when he first saw Gilmorecoming across the field. He ran for his gun and Gilmore saw him and wasgone when he returned. It was some time before Gilmore returned to theneighborhood and the feeling had subsided by then. Gilmores family hadbeen in the Union forces.
CHARLES GRENADE COLYER had evening prayers and the entire family wouldcome in and kneel for prayers.


CHARLES GRENADE and his wife LOUISA JANE had eleven children. Alltaught school at some time after they grew up. He was a school trustee.
The 1870 and 1880 Pulaski County Census show CHARLES G. COLYER listed asa farmer, born in Kentucky and his parents born in Tennessee, and LOUISAJANE COLYER as his wife, born in Kentucky and her parents both born inKentucky.
CHARLES G. COLYER died at his home on Pitman Creek April 11, 1910 andhis wife LOUISA JANE COLYER died January 13, 1931, in Pulaski County,Kentucky. She had received a Confederate Widows pension for hisservice. Scare Moser and Ray Colyer, both grandchildren,recall LOUISA JANE, as a small lady, about 5'11 tall, slender, withcoal black hair throughout her life.


Obituary of CHARLES GRANAID COLYER, printed in the
Somerset, Kentucky newspaper in April, 1910


CHARLES GRANAID COLYER, who resided about three miles south-east of town,died last Monday, after several months of feeble health due to age and ageneral wearing out of the vital organs.
His father was JOHN COLYER, who lived and reared a large family of 19sons and daughters, and died on the old homestead now known as the Warrenfarm at the bridge of Pitman creek and the Sublimity road, about six andone half miles from this town, and his mother was LYDIA Purvis, who wasthe old gentlemen's second wife and the mother of fourteen of hischildren and his first wife was a Miss Sinclair, who was the mother offive of the older children.
I first became intimately acquainted with the family of JOHN COLYER Sr.in 1856, when my father removed to the farm adjoining theirs on theopposite side of Pitman creek, now the Allen farm, and from the firstmoment was convinced that there never was a more gallant, neighborly orhospitable family in the world. To the young man's mind their home was amodel place to get good treatment and have a joyous Happy time. It wasbetter than a circus to be with those old big boys at the corn huskingsor hoeing; threshings or stacking; the log cutting or rollings, and tohave to do hard and heavy work, when four or five of them were on handand helping at the labor, it was the best kind of entertainment, and wewant to tell you that no laddie was ever imposed upon in that goodcompany, for they stood over those in need of a defender on everyoccasion.


I knew nearly all of the family well but ten of the younger ones werebest known to me and GRANAID was one of them. All of the Colyer 5differed from me in religious name and also in political as well, butthey were always my friends, even in old war times when we were in battlearray for the right, each as we saw it and in our personal associationsnone of us ever dared to attempt to muzzle the other or make one too dumbto speak his honest sentiment.
GRANAID COLYER was the last one of that large family to pass from theearth to the Great Beyond and my faith in God's promises and my knowledgeof his manner of life leads me to say to his good wife and other lovedones that it is all well with him for he surely has the righteous man1sreward.
His brother, J. Perry Colyer, died only a few months ago. The firstset of children of John Colyer's were Buford, John Alex, Williamand Mrs. Dickie Smith.


His full brothers and sisters were Lindsey, Cy, Jehu, Sinclair, Martin,Wesley, Perry, GRANAID, Samuel, Nathaniel, and Mrs. Harriet Black, Mrs.Menerva Richardson, Mrs. Lizzie Eastman, and one other.
Their old father died over half a century ago and their mother over athird of a century, and this writer made obituary notices of most of themas they passed away a sad duty that we have performed faithfully.
To his last afflicted wife and her noble children, we extend sincerestcondolences, as their long-time friend.


1 Confederate Pension Records, #1585 to 1652; Kentucky HistoricalSociety, Frankfort, Kentucky.


2 Confederate Records, The National Archives, Washington,D.C.
Kentucky Adjutant General's Report, Confederate States Army, SixthRegiment Cavalry.


Interview with EllenColyer:


The Colyer family lived on a farm on Pitman Creek about four mileseast of Somerset. She told of she and all of her sistersknitting all of their stockings when they were young. Near their home wasa spring in a rock outcropping that formed a small depression or cavethat was cool and not only furnished water but also was used tostore and keep food cool. The house was constructed of heavy logs and itwas still standing, but unoccupied in 1967. Their home had a front roomand behind this room was a dining room and then a living room with alarge fireplace. Beside the front room was a bedroom and upstairs overthe front room was another bedroom. The kitchen was in a separatestructure next to the dining room. The kitchen and the house wereseperated by a space about five feet wide often called a "dog trot" inthat area. This space between the house and the kitchen was common inearly farm houses as it would help keep the house cool in the summer andcould be helpful in case of fire. There was a barn that was behind thehouse.
Ellen went to Lawrenceburg College near Corbin, Kentucky and taughtschool for several years before she was married and she boarded with thegrandparents of John Sherman Cooper, who was later the United StatesSenator form Kentucky. She taught grades 1-5 for a year after she wasmarried. She taught in the school district where C. W. SEARS lived.All of her adult brothers and sisters taught school at one time andseveral made their career in education.
BERT and ELLEN had three children: OLLIE B. born August 11. 1904 inPulaski County, Kentucky, Raymond born July 12 in Pulaski County anddied March 9, 1908 and is buried at Souls Chapel Cemetery east ofSomerset in Pulaski County. and Naomi Elizabeth, born February 14, 1915in Ft. Worth.
Tarrent County. Texas.
ELLEN CQLYER SEARS' sister Luvenia and her husband Hansford Wilder movedto Fort Worth, Texas and opened a grocery store. In early 1906 they sentfor ELLEN' S brother Sam Colyer to come to Fort Worth to work with themat the grocerv store. The Wilder's sold the store to Sam Colyer andmoved to California. A week after their son Raymond died in Kentucky BERTand ELLEN SEARS and their daughter OLLIE moved to Texas and BERT SEARSworked in the store for Sam Colyer. After a year or two BERT SEARSbought a half interest in the store.
In 1915 Sam Colyer's mother Louisa Jane Colyer wanted him to return toKentucky. Sam Colyer sold the store to BERT SEARS and moved back toKentucky. When the C. W. SEARS family first moved to Fort Worth, Texasthey lived in a house in the 2000 block of Clinton Street, then theymoved to 2122 N Houston Street, and then to 318 N. W. 22nd Street. Thislast house was originally one story and later had a second story addedtoit. This house was on the same lot as the store and also had a threecar garage next to the alley. BERT and ELLEN Sears lived in this homefor the rest of their life. The store located on the corner of 22nd andClinton Streets was first of frame construction and was later replacedwith a red brick store. Mr. SEARS was in the grocery business 33years. He_was a strong family man, attended church regularlythroughout his life, he was treasurer of his church, and theSears'family often has ministers stay at their home while they were inFort Worth. He enjoyed hunting squirrel with his single shot 410shotgun and he was known for the excellent barbecue that he made daily athis grocery store. Around his home he had many varieties of plants andflowers that he enjoyed. There were pecan trees, pear trees, a peachtree, a fig tree, canna plants beside the store, and flowering shrubs andplants decorated the property.
ELLEN SEARS was also very active in their church. Attendingn regularlySunday school. Sunday worship services, Sunday evening services. andWednesday evening prayer services. She was in the church choir and madethe communion bread that was used in communion services at their churchfor years.
MRS. SEARs was an excellent cook and made homemade bread, biscuits,fruitcakes, pies, and preserved or canned many things such as chow-chow,relish, pickled peaches, and jellies.
Their home was warm and friendly and a gathering place for theirchildren, grand children and friends. They were good parents, neighborsand friends to have. C. W. SEARS died October 12, 1945 in Fort Worth,Texas. ELLEN SEARS died at her home July 23, 1957 and is buried next toher husband at Garden of Memories Cemetery, Fort Worth, Texas


The following items are taken from The Somerset Journal of
October, 1902: Representatives from Crescent Lodge No. 60, Knights ofPythias, at
the Grand Lodge in session in Louisville this week are J.F. Hines, C.H.
Lewis, C.G. Colyer, and Jno. S. Tate. Mrs. Colyer and Mrs. Tateaccompanied
the delegates.


Members of 6th Kentucky Confederate Calvary
6th Kentucky Confederate Calvary fromhttp://www.rootsweb.com/~kymil/cw/conf/sixth_kentucky_cavalry.html


M.B. Perkins C Captain Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
J. Wesley Collier C 1st Lieutenant Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.Later moved after war to Perry Georgia
Virgil P. Moore C 2nd Lieutenant Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.Supposed to be prisoner
John S. May C 2nd Lieutenant Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Supposedto be prisoner
Alfred L. Alcorn C 2nd Lieutenant Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.Killed while being transferred from Johnson's Island to Fort Delaware;prisoner of war.
S. J. Brown C 2nd Lieutenant Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Woundedin Lebanon, Ky. July 5, 1863
Alfred L. Alcorn C 1st Sgt. Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Promotedto 2nd. Lt.
Stephen J. Brown C 2nd Sgt. Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Promotedto 2nd. Lt.
Joseph Lane C 3rd Sgt. Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Samuel Gover C 4th Sqt. Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Lafayette Moore C 1st Corp. Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. MissingOct. 17, 1862
Milford Lee C 2nd Corp. Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Robert Phelps C 3rd Corp. Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Daniel Colyer C 4th Corp. Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Hardin Alexander C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
John Brown C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Missing Oct.16, 1862
Jonas Brown C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Benjamin Brown C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Missing Oct.15, 1862
James Birch C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
William H. Ballew C Private Oct. 2, 1862 Somerset, Ky. MissingOct. 15, 1862
William Ballew C Private Oct. 2, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Iradell Bray C Private Oct. 2, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Milford Bralton C Private Oct. 2, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
William Burton C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Missing Oct.14, 1862 d. 1928 bur. Pleasant Point, Lincoln Co., KY
Willis Colyer C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Charles W. Colyer C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
James G. Colyer C Private Sept. 17, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Richard Colyer C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
George Callahan C Private Sept. 15, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
William C. Curd C Private Sept. 15, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
William Colyer C Private Oct. 8, 1862 Somerset, Ky. buried Colyercemetery highway 769 (Rush Branch Rd)
Logan Colyer C Private Nov. 1, 1862 Knoxville, Tn.
James P. Colyer C Private Jan. 24, 1863 Beech Grove, Tn.
C.J.(should be G) Colyer C Private Jan. 24, 1863 Beech Grove,Tn. This is Grenade Colyer
Lewis P. Cowan C Private Oct. 14, 1862 Lancaster, Tn. By transferfrom Capt. Shanks' Co. in Jan, 1863
Martin T. Colyer C Private Dec. 1, 1862 Mufreesboro, Tn. Bytransfer from Capt. Shanks' Co. in Jan, 1863
Samuel B. Colyer C Private Jan. 4, 1862 Monticello, Ky. Bytransfer from Capt. B.E. Roberts' Co. in Jan, 1863
Thomas Dans C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Elijah Denny C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Doctor Denny C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Elijah Dikes C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Deserted Dec.20, 1862
S. Wesley Earp C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
W. Madison Earp C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
John Eastham C Private Sept. 15, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
James Eastham C Private Oct. 23, 1862 New Market, Tn.
Perry Elliott C Private Sept. 6, 1862 Danville, Ky. By transferfrom Capt. Lemmon's Co., Jan. 7, 1863
E.T. Elliott C Private Feb. 1, 1863 Beech Grove, Tn.
Walter J. Fields C Private Transferred to Capt. Shanks'Co., Sept. 1, 1862
Chrisley Gastinew, Sr. C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Chrisley Gastinew, Jr. C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Martin Gregg C Private Oct. 8, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
James Gilmore C Private Oct. 8, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Washington Herrin C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Edward Herrin C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Levi Hubble C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. last namespelled Hubbel on Ags report, by transfer from Capt. Shanks' Co., Nov.,17 1862
Joseph A. Hardwick C Private Transferred to Capt. B.E.Roberts' Co., January 1863
Thomas Hargis C Private Died Feb. 10, 1863
Thomas Jasper C Private Sept. 13, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Martin Keeney C Private Nov. 6, 1862 New Market, Tn.
James Luytrell, Sr. C Private Sept. 13, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
James Luytrell, Jr. C Private Sept. 13, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Wesley Long C Private Deserted Dec. 20, 1862
Archibald Marshall C Private Oct. 8, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
James Moonyham C Private Somerset, Ky.
Jacob Miller C Private Somerset, Ky.
Moses Murphy C Private Beech Grove, Tn.
William Murphy C Private Lancaster, Ky. By transfer from Capt.Shanks' Co. in Jan, 1863
Simeon E. Owens C Private Somerset, Ky. Died Feb. 3, 1863
George Pence C Private Somerset, Ky.
T.K. Phelps C Private Somerset, Ky.
Henry Powell C Private Beech Grove, Tn.
Jesse L. Reynolds C Private Somerset, Ky.
Moses Reynolds C Private Somerset, Ky.
Robert W. Reynolds C Private Somerset, Ky. Buried in LibertyBaptist Church Cem., Pulaski Co., Ky. Was last surviving Confederatesoldier in Lincoln Co., Ky.
Alexander Randall C Private
Josiah Smith C Private Somerset, Ky.
James C. Smith C Private Somerset, Ky.
Willis J. Stogsdell C Private Sept., 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Quarles Simpson C Private Oct. 11, 1862 Somerset, Ky. MissingOct.14, 1862
John J. Smiley C Private Oct.8, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Cornelius Simpson C Private Nov. 16, 1862 Sweet Water, Tn.
William Thompson, Sr. C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.Missing Oct.14, 1862
William Thompson, Jr. C Private Sept. 13, 1862 Somerset, Ky.Missing Oct.16, 1862
James R. Turner C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Joseph C. Vanhook C Private Sept. 13, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
Andrew Vanhook C Private Died Feb. 13, 1863
George Wheeldon C Private Sept. 13, 1862 Somerset, Ky. MissingOct. 21, 1862
Robert Warren C Private Sept. 12, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Missing Oct.14, 1862
William Woodcock C Private Sept. 15, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
G.A. Warren C Private Sept. 15, 1862 Somerset, Ky. Missing Oct.16, 1862
John W. Williams C Private Oct. 2, 1862 Somerset, Ky. MissingOct. 16, 1862
David Warren C Private Sept. 15, 1862 Somerset, Ky.
W.W. Cleaver D Captain June

spouse: Meece, Louisa Jane (1842 - 1931)
- m. 14 JUL 1861 in Pulaski Co., Kentucky

----------child: Colyer, Cyrenius E. (1861 - 1934)
----------child: Colyer, Sarah E. (1865 - 1881)
----------child: Colyer, Nathaniel (1867 - 1939)
----------child: Colyer, Charles G. (1869 - 1956)
----------child: Colyer, Luvina (*1871 - )
----------child: Colyer, Bluford Pinctner (1871 - 1872)
----------child: Colyer, Lydia (1873 - 1889)
----------child: Colyer, Harriet Luvenia (1875 - 1941)
----------child: Colyer, Ellen Nevada (1877 - 1957)
----------child: Colyer, Lucy Alma (1879 - 1965)
----------child: Colyer, Garfield (~1879 - )
----------child: Colyer, Leola Matilda (1881 - 1882)
----------child: Colyer, Samuel (1884 - 1972)
Colyer, Charles Granade (1860 - 1935) - male
b. 1860
d. 1935

father: Colyer, Cyrenius W. (1824 - 1898)
mother: Waddle, Sarah (1832 - 1874)
spouse: Ross, Bobbie (*1866 - )
----------child: Colyer, Niola (1898 - )
Colyer, Charles Richard (1836 - 1903) - male
b. 2 FEB 1836 in Ruth, Kentucky
d. 18 APR 1903

father: Colyer, James Alexander (1811 - 1888)
mother: Sears, Lydia (1812 - 1889)
email dated 6/12/2004
Richard,
That was Quick!!


I hope you can understand this, sometimes I have trouble reading other
people's cause they're not plain.


There's a recap at the bottom .


My father was Kenneth George COLYER (Dads brother Denny Arthur, SisterMamia
Goff).


My brothers are Kenneth Lee in Osgood, In and Donald Ray in Paragon, In.
North west of Indy.


Kenneth G.'s father was Arthur Wesley COLYER b.1-14-1891 Pulaski Co.Ky. d.
12-1965 Council, Va. (Some have him as William, this is wrong.
Sometime after his Marriage 3-5-1910 to LuVada Goff b.1895 he startedgoing
by only Wes.
Ole Man Wes married Cora Nell Burton (after LuVada died 1921 inCincinnati,
Oh buried in Elihu, Ky. Cabin Hollow-Northfield Rd.)
Ole Man Wes and Cora Nell had Wesley Arthur Jr. b. 8-26-1926 died7-24-1944
on the US Colorado off Saipan, his Head stone is in Nancy, Ky. Wes Jr.
sisters are Rosie and Helen Ruth. Ole man Wes worked on the railroad and
came home one day and found Cora Nell in bed with a man then there wasHelen
Ruth. Cora Nell's sister Callie (Callaway) married Ably Thomas (Abe) oneof
Ole Man Wes's brothers Callie also was stepping out on Abe. Ab had Virgil
(Pee Wee) Ozzie (Female) and Othen he lives in Shepardsville,Ky in his90's.


Richard this was going to be short, Sorry.


Ole man Wes's brothers are Martin Ernest or Ernest Martin my Aunt Mamie G.
calls him Martin his family call's him Ernie. Martin E. b.2-3-1895 d.7-1967
in Dayton, Ky. Married Lucy Thacker Child was John Elmer (Emil per John
himself, he lives in Ubank, Ky. I have resent 2003 Photos of him) He saidhe
has 19 children, He said he would have name them all John if he couldhave.
Charles F. 4-17-1898 and Ably Thomas COLYER, sisters of Ole man Wes are
Ethyl Mae b.2-26-1888 d.7-7-1969 (Ethie as I knew her and husband Francis
Jones) Ethie lived with her Dauthger Mary Ellen Jones Wendlegast in
Louisville, Ky when she died. Mary Ellen b.1909 died 4-9-2002. SonsKenneth
and Thomas Wendlegast.
Ole man Wes other sisters Nellie Elizabeth Colyer Hennon b.8-12-1907 d.
10-24-1992 Jacksonville, Fla. Daughters LaVerne H. Hennon Patrick. Sister
Ellen (Bab),Lilly, Lennie C . b.4-1893 married a Mr. Silvers son Leo
Silvers, Addie B.b. 11-1899, LaVady COLYER married Lonnie Huhges.


Ole Man Wes's father (my Great Great Grandfather) was Martin Thomas COLYER
b.7-16-1866 Pulaski Co. d. 6-4-1923 form Nephritis buried in Haynes Cem.
(Cabin Hollow Rd??) married Sarah Emma Haynes.


Martin Thomas COLYER 1866 (99% sure) farther was Charles Richard COLYER b.
2-2-1836 in Ruth d. 4-18-1903 Pulaski Co. a School teacher married to
Suzannah Richardson.b.1844 d. 5-24-1916. Charles Richard 1836 Childrenwere
Martin Thomas 1866., Nancy Ann, Martha Ellen, James Harding 1876, LouisaC.,
Robbert Lee, Sarah Elizabeth, John W. 9-13-1859.
Charles Richard COLYER's 1836 Father was James Alexander COLYERb.2-26-1810
d. 1888 married to Lydia Sears b.5-26-1812 d.1889 James Alexander 1810
children were Charles Richard 1836, Nancy 7-25-1838, Mary (Polly) Ann
12-30-1845, Sarah Jane 1-15-1841, Lindsay Randall 1844, Louisa J. or M.
8-21-1842, Hariett B., Hamil R, John D., 12-20-1851.


James Alexander COLYER's 1810 Father was John Wesley COLYER b. 8-20-1781d.
8-18-1851 buried Soul Chapal Pulaski Co. Married Lydia Purvis Children of
John Wesley 1781 were : James Alexander 1810, James or John Perry 1828,
Harriet, St. Clair, Elizabeth, Lindsey Robert Sr. 1821, Menerva, Martin
8-19-1830, John Wesley ? 1834, Charles Grenade 1832, Cyrenus Wait, Jehu
1827.


Recap Wesley Martin 1946, Kenneth George 1916, Wesley Arthur 1891, Martin
Thomas 1866, Charles Richard 1836, James Alexander 1810, John Wesley 1781.


Which John is that there is so many??


> Wesley,

spouse: Richardson, Susannah (1845 - 1916)
----------child: Colyer, John W. (1859 - )
----------child: Colyer, Nancy A. (1863 - )
----------child: Colyer, Martha Ellen (1864 - 1943)
----------child: Colyer, Martin Thomas (1866 - 1923)
----------child: Colyer, Robert T. (1868 - )
----------child: Colyer, William A. (1871 - )
----------child: Colyer, Robert Lee (*1874 - )
----------child: Colyer, Louisa C. (1874 - )
----------child: Colyer, James Hardin (1875 - 1938)
----------child: Colyer, Sarah Eliz. (1879 - )
----------child: Colyer, Charles A. (1881 - )
----------child: Colyer, Walter D. (1884 - )
spouse: Randall, Jemima (1840 - )
Colyer, Charles Waddle (*1861 - ) - male
father: Colyer, Cyrenius W. (1824 - 1898)
mother: Waddle, Sarah (1832 - 1874)
Colyer, Chloe (1827 - 1828) - female
b. 1827
d. 1828

father: Colyer, Charles Eve (1786 - 1876)
mother: Renfro, Mary (Polly) (1775 - 1832)
Colyer, Christine (*1920 - ) - female
father: Colyer, James Bufford (1885 - 1973)
Colyer, Christine Ophelia (1911 - 1913) - female
b. 11 NOV 1911 in Burnside, Pulaski Co., Kentucky
d. 13 JUN 1913

father: Colyer, Milford Alexander Campbell (1880 - 1945)
mother: Hughes, Elizabeth Perkins (1882 - 1968)
Colyer, Claudia Jean (*1930 - ) - female
father: Colyer, Littleton Wheeler (1894 - 1947)
mother: Corman, Pearl (*1902 - 1978)
spouse: Spahr, Paul (*1926 - )
Colyer, Clide (1917 - ) - male
b. 1917

father: Colyer, Sidney Forest (1884 - )
mother: Sears, Pearl Bell (*1886 - )
Colyer, Cliva Marie (1922 - ) - female
b. 12 DEC 1922

father: Colyer, Perry Lee (1893 - 1958)
mother: Howard, Bessie (1903 - 1963)
Richard Curtis interviewed by phone Cliva 06/26/2005
spouse: Minton, Dan (1921 - 1983)
- m. 14 OCT 1946

----------child: Minton, Donald (1949 - )
----------child: Minton, Diane (1951 - )
----------child: Minton, Darwin (1953 - )
----------child: Minton, Dana (1957 - )
----------child: Minton, Thomas (1961 - )
Colyer, Cordelia (1874 - ) - female
b. 1874

father: Colyer, Lindsay (1844 - 1930)
mother: Warren, Elizabeth Ann (1849 - 1876)
Colyer, Cyrenius (1865 - ) - male
b. 1865

father: Colyer, Cyrenius W. (1824 - 1898)
mother: Waddle, Sarah (1832 - 1874)

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